airwolf

~*~ Elder Airwolf LoP Ministry Founder/Owner~*~

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Merry Meet Legionnaires~
I am sixth generation Native Blackfoot and Scottish Celt. My Grandmother was one of my mentors her being a shaman, and my other mentor was my Druid Celtic Aunt. I was raised pagan and my education started at the age
of seven and formally after my first moon lodge ritual at 12. I am also trained as a voodoo priestess
I have one son now coming into his native shaman training and 4 beautiful grandchildren.

~The Red Tent~

Lifetime's miniseries 'The Red Tent' focuses on Dinah, one minor character from the Bible.

I watched part one was was pleasantly surprised at the "finally" the women and their Goddess Inanna has been included in this biblical story. Even as the story unfolds, the women of the red tent celebrated in secrecy their beloved goddess Inanna having to hide their idols from their husband. Ultimately they were discovered and destroyed as men saw lesser in the woman forcing her to surcome to the male and his God.
Like the mega-seller book that was its inspiration and blueprint, Lifetime’s miniseries “The Red Tent” uses the trappings of the Old Testament to frame a message that goes beyond any one religion.

Nor should the ease with which “The Red Tent” connects the secular and the spiritual surprise anyone, says executive producer Paula Weinstein.

“There’s a reason biblical stories have lasted thousands of years,” she says. “They're universal. Western morality today is still based on principles in the Bible.

“For some people, they’re real history. For other people, they’re a metaphor for life.”

Author Anita Diamant’s approach in her 1997 book was to take particular characters from the Bible and look at their stories from a different perspective.

So Diamant’s story, and this miniseries, focus on Dinah (Rebecca Ferguson), the daughter of Jacob (Iain Glen) and one of his four wives, Leah (Minnie Driver).

In the Bible Dinah is a minor character, mentioned in passing. “The Red Tent” suggests that in fact she had as full, interesting and instructive a life as male characters, including her father and brothers, whose stories the Bible much more prominently details.

Dinah herself lays out that premise bluntly at the start of the miniseries, in a voiceover narration that essentially says men have hijacked history, downplaying or writing out the role and value of women.

“The Red Tent” dramatizes that marginalization for Dinah and the women around her. Even those who are loved and appreciated are also seen as property, to be bartered or sold. Just as often women are regarded as little more than utilitarian slaves. Nor is this just an ancient-times issue.

Like the mega-seller book that was its inspiration and blueprint, Lifetime’s miniseries “The Red Tent” uses the trappings of the Old Testament to frame a message that goes beyond any one religion.

Nor should the ease with which “The Red Tent” connects the secular and the spiritual surprise anyone, says executive producer Paula Weinstein.

“There’s a reason biblical stories have lasted thousands of years,” she says. “They're universal. Western morality today is still based on principles in the Bible.

“For some people, they’re real history. For other people, they’re a metaphor for life.”

Author Anita Diamant’s approach in her 1997 book was to take particular characters from the Bible and look at their stories from a different perspective.

So Diamant’s story, and this miniseries, focus on Dinah (Rebecca Ferguson), the daughter of Jacob (Iain Glen) and one of his four wives, Leah (Minnie Driver).

In the Bible Dinah is a minor character, mentioned in passing. “The Red Tent” suggests that in fact she had as full, interesting and instructive a life as male characters, including her father and brothers, whose stories the Bible much more prominently details.

Dinah herself lays out that premise bluntly at the start of the miniseries, in a voiceover narration that essentially says men have hijacked history, downplaying or writing out the role and value of women.

“The Red Tent” dramatizes that marginalization for Dinah and the women around her. Even those who are loved and appreciated are also seen as property, to be bartered or sold. Just as often women are regarded as little more than utilitarian slaves. Nor is this just an ancient-times issue.

Rebecca Ferguson as Dinah and Iain Glen as Jacob in “The Red Tent” Rebecca Ferguson as Dinah and Iain Glen as Jacob in “The Red Tent”
“Our story is set in biblical times,” Weinstein notes, “but there are countries today where that’s still how women are regarded. In that sense, it’s a contemporary story.”

The critical juncture in Dinah’s story comes when something happens to her that compels her brothers to take an action they feel is necessary to protect their family honor. She is not consulted, and the action horrifies her in addition to cruelly disregarding her feelings.

This creates a deep estrangement in the family, and sends Dinah on a very different path than that of her male siblings.

The authors of the Bible did not choose to follow her part of the story. “The Red Tent” does, thus tacitly arguing that if we don’t know what happened to Dinah, our knowledge is incomplete.

“It’s a ‘what-if’ story,” says Weinstein. “What if this story had been told from a different point of view that included a woman like Dinah?”

The physical red tent in the book, and miniseries, is the place within the family encampment where women take refuge for “women's matters,” including birth.

Dinah describes in detail how it becomes a culture within a culture, a place where stories and arts and skills are passed from mother to daughter.

She laments how those parts of the culture and those rituals are largely ignored by the men who write history and focus almost entirely on their own deeds and rituals.

Weinstein says she read the book years ago, “just to read it. . . . I wasn't thinking of it as any kind of production. TV wasn’t doing many miniseries at that time and I knew there was no way to tell this story in a regular hour and a half or two-hour movie.”

Morena Baccarin stars as Rachel in Lifetime’s “The Red Tent.” Morena Baccarin stars as Rachel in Lifetime’s “The Red Tent.”
But cable expansion brought the miniseries back and once “The Red Tent” was green-lit, the Morocco-based production took about three years.

“That’s relatively short these days,” says Weinstein. “Once we got under way, everything went very smoothly.”

She says the idea from the start was to follow the Diamant book “very closely” and that while some parts of the book had to be compressed, the essence of the story was retained.

She doesn’t see “The Red Tent” as part of any movement toward more faith-based productions along the lines of Mark Burnett and Roma Downey’s “The Bible.”

“We just always felt,” she says, “that we had a great story.”

Lifetime is not, however, overlooking the biblical connection.

The first part of “The Red Tent,” 9-11 p.m. Sunday, will be preceded by “Women of the Bible” (7-9 p.m.), a special produced by Burnett and Downey.

It’s a documentary in which scholars discuss women who did appear in the Bible, from Eve to Mary Magdalene, and talk about the ways in which they were portrayed.

(Soyal, Soyala, Sol-ya-lang-eu)

(Soyal, Soyala, Sol-ya-lang-eu)

The date of this observation is on December 22. It is celebrated by the Hopi Indians. Although a black Plumed Snake is the basic symbol of this ceremony. But it is not based on snake worship. (Just like their Snake Dance Ceremony isn't either.) It is a ceremony related to the sun as it relates to the winter solstice. It is one of the Hopi's most sacred ceremonies and is also called the "Prayer-Offering Ceremony" because it is a time for saying prayers for the New Year and for wishing each other prosperity and health.

Worshiping the sun is pretty common among many ancient people. In North America, the Hopi also noticed that the sun rose and set at different points on the horizon. They also noticed that the sun would reach it's most vertical position in the summer and that when the sun rose lower in the sky it meant that the weather was colder and the earth was barren.

In midsummer, the Hopi performed their Snake Dance Ceremony when they felt the sun was close to the earth. (See our page on this Sun Dance) But, basically the Sun Dance was a request for rain from the gods of the underworld. But, when the sun started to go away, the Hopi attention was now focused on the sun leaving them altogether. Yikes!

The Hopi believed that at the winter solstice that took place in December the Sun God had traveled as far from the earth as he ever did. So, in order to bring the Sun God back, this meant that it would require the most powerful humans (aka Hopi warriors) to talk the Sun God to turn around and come back to them.

Therefore, the whole purpose of the Soyaluna ceremony that the Hopi do still to this day, is to prevent the disappearance of the sun at the time of the year when the days are the shortest.

How do they do that?

The preparations for the Soyaluna ceremony start by cutting pieces of cotton string and tying feathers and pinyon needles to the end. These are exchanged among friends and relatives during the day. Sometimes this is done by tying them in the recipient's hair.

When the person who made this feathered string gives it to someone, he says, "May all the Katchinas grant you your wishes tomorrow." The Katchinas are the spirits of the Hopi ancestors. (See our page on Niman Katchina.) Then the giver holds it vertically and moves the string back and forth horizontally. Later that night, everyone takes a willow branch and attaches all the strings that he or she has received to it. The sticks are carried to the kiva (ceremonial meeting room) and placed in the rafters making the room look like a bower of feathers and pinyon needs. (More about the Kiva is on this page.)

The main celebration will take place in the kiva wear the chief resident of the Hopi society wears a headdress decorated with images that symbolize rain clouds. He will also carry a shield that has a star, an antelope and other symbolic objects have been drawn. Someone will also carry an effigy of Palulukonuh, also called the "Plumed Snake" what is carved from the woody stalk of the agave plant.

The shield bearers enter the kiva and take turns stamping on the sipapu (a shallow hole covered by a board that symbolizes the entrance to the underworld.) Then they arrange themselves into two groups: One on the north side of the room. One on the south side of the room. They then start singing as the bearer of the sun shield rushes to one side and then the other. He is driven back by the shield bearers on both sides. The movements of the shield bearers symbolize the attack of hostile powers on the sun. It's not uncommon for one or more of the participants in this mock struggle to faint from the heat inside the kiva and exhaustion.

One the west wall of the kiva is an altar made up of a stack of corn (two or more ears have been contributed by each family in the pueblo, surrounded by husks and stalks. There's also a large gourd with an opening in it. The head of the effigy of the Plumed Snake sticks out of this gourd. In a puppet-like manner, the snakes head will rise slowly to the center of the opening and make a roaring noise. (All this is done by someone manipulating it in the background behind the altar.) The shield bearers will then throw meal to the Plumed Snake effigy. In response to each offering the snake roars. When the Sun God's footprints appear in the sand, everyone knows that he's been persuaded to return.

The name "Soyala" means Time of the Winter to those who have been given that name.

The effigy of the plumed snake that is in the kiva is painted black and has a tongue-like appendage protruding from it's mouth. This black snake symbolizes the evil influences that are driving the sun away. So the assembled chiefs make their offerings of prayer and meal to this black Plumed Snake to try to persuade him not to "swallow" the sun, like he does when there is an eclipse.

The Hopis believe that the days are shorter in the winter and grow longer in the summer because it's driven away by hostile forces and then after a considerable battle it's persuaded to return. So, without the Soyaluna ceremony the sun might never come back, bringing warmer weather that's needed for growing corn and other food.

So, the bearers of the Sun Shield represent the Hopi Sun God, whose favors are crucial to the tribe's survival.

Source of Information:
"Holidays, Symbols & Customs 3rd Edition"
By Sue Ellen Thompson
Omnigraphics, Inc. © 2003

Native Rituals~

The next month, the buffalo is recognized, and the Tewa see this as a time of healing and life. Native American holidays often celebrate the sun as a life-giving power, both physically and spiritually.

The American holly tree or Ilex opaca is a species of holly native to New England.

There are several Native American holidays and traditional festivals. Most tribes have their own individual celebrations, but many of the holidays have common themes or purposes. The holidays often celebrate nature, the spiritual world, or people's ancestors. Popular holidays might honor the sun, the rain, or crops needed to sustain life. Many holidays stretch for a week, rather than just one day.

The start of the new year is honored by some Native Americans, although many tribes have selected different dates as the last day of the year. The Hopi and the Zuni both celebrate a new year's celebration on 22 December. This ceremony is called Soyal, and it is a time of renewal and purification. A ritual is conducted to welcome the sun back after winter.

The Makahiki new year festival is celebrated in Hawaii in October. It celebrates new beginnings and honors the Hawaiian god Lono, who represents fertility, music and rain. There are three phases of Makahiki, with the first consisting of purification and spiritual cleansing. During the second phase, the Native Hawaiians celebrate with hula dancing and athletic competitions. The final phase honors Lono and tests the tribe's current chief to ensure he is still worthy as a leader.

The Tewa Native Americans celebrate three dances throughout the year honoring a different animal each time. The year begins with a turtle dance, which remembers and honors the day of creation. For three days in October, they celebrate with the deer dance, which represents both femininity and masculinity. The next month, the buffalo is recognized, and the Tewa see this as a time of healing and life.

Native American holidays often celebrate the sun as a life-giving power, both physically and spiritually. The Inca called their sun god Inti, and they celebrated him during the Inti Raymi. This festival traditionally begins on 21 June, the southern hemisphere's winter solstice. The celebrations consist of elaborate dances and the wearing of many bright colors. Originally, animal sacrifices were offered in hopes of an abundant year.

The tribes typically celebrated the rain as often as they honored the sun. The Iroquois and the Mayans both held rain celebrations during their wet seasons. The Iroquois thunder ceremony was held for a week in mid-April, with celebrations during the ceremony including rain dances and story-telling sessions that pass along mythology explaining the cause of rain, clouds, and lightning.

Many of these holidays are about food, crops, or hunting. The Zuni, Cherokee, and Iroquois all have holidays to celebrate the growth and harvest of corn. Other crops honored among common Native Americans are squash, strawberries, and maple trees.

Soyal is a traditional solstice celebration which is held by the Hopi Indians on the day and night of the winter solstice. Many cultures all over the world celebrate the solstice in various ways, since the shortest day of the year carries a lot of symbolism for cultures which live by the cycles of the seasons. For the Hopi, the Soyal ceremony is one of the most important ceremonies of the year, and it is also an excellent excuse for a party, and a chance to socialize with friends and neighbors.

During this winter festival, the Hopi perform ceremonies which are intended to call the sun back from its winter sleep. The Hopi believe that the sun god has traveled far from the tribe on the solstice, so they use warriors and other powerful members of the tribe to coax the sun back. Soyal is also traditionally a time for purification and blessings, and it marks the turning of the year. In addition to performing specific ceremonies on Soyal, many Hopi also exchange gifts and well wishes.

The Soyal ceremony is preceded by gifts of feathers bound with cotton or other fibers which are exchanged among members of the tribe. As night falls, the Hopi gather in a kiva, a sacred underground prayer space, bringing their gifts of feathers to decorate the space while people dance, pray, give offerings to the gods, and play music. The celebrants also perform an elaborate dance which mimics the struggle between darkness and light, with the sun god ultimately emerging in triumph.

One of the distinctive images of Soyal is an effigy of a plumed snake, which represents the forces of darkness which try to swallow the sun. During the ceremony, people make offerings to the snake which are intended to appease it so that it does not swallow the sun god. The sun is represented by a traditional shield which is carried in the Soyal dance.

This Native American celebration has a lot in common with solstice traditions from other parts of the world; visitors from other traditional cultures would probably find a lot in common between Soyal and their own winter holidays. Like many societies, the Hopi connect the return of the sun with a triumph of good over evil, and they use the longest night of the year as a time to reflect and to purify themselves for the upcoming year.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony

 

The Native American Soyal Solstice Ceremony ceremony. Discover facts and information about the culture of Native American Indians and their belief in the power of the Soyal Solstice Ceremony
The Soyal Solstice Ceremony

Definition of Soyal Solstice Ceremony: What is the Soyal Solstice Ceremony? The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is also called the Great Feast of the Winter Solstice and is celebrated by the Southwest Pueblo, Zuni and Hopi tribes of Native Americans. The Soyal solstice ceremony is held on December 21 which is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and marks the Winter Solstice. The purpose of the Soyal ceremony and ritual is to bring the sun back from its long winter slumber. The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is a major Hopi ceremony which is celebrated over a period of 16 days which starts with prayers and supplications and ends with a feast and Kachina Dance. The Native American name for this important ceremony is 'Soyalangwul' from which the term 'Soyal is derived.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony - The Sun Priest
The Pueblo Indians depended on accurate predictions of major astronomical events such as a solstice or equinox to allow them to prepare for important ceremonies, dances and rituals. The task of making accurate astronomical events, such as the summer and winter solstice, was assigned to the Sun Priest called the 'Cacique' by the Pueblo or the Pekwin by the Zuni.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony - Kachina Dances
The Southwestern Pueblo, Zuni and Hopi tribes celebrated the Great Feast of the Winter Solstice, the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, to turn the sun back toward its summer path and renew the life stages for the coming year. The Hopi and Zuni believe that the sun god has traveled the furthest distance from the tribe at the winter solstice, so warriors and other powerful members of the tribe were tasked to entice the sun back. They therefore performed Kachina dances as part of the Soyal Solstice Ceremony. A Kachina was powerful being or spirit who, if given due veneration and proper respect, could use their powers for the good and well being of the people, bringing rainfall, healing, fertility, or protection. There are more than 400 different types of kachina in the Pueblo culture, each holding different powers and influence. Kokopelli is the most famous of all the Kachina spirits. Kachina spirits are represented by dolls and emulated at ceremonies, called Kachinas, in which the participants wear masks and highly colorful costumes. The Great Feast of the Winter Solstice, the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, is a typical Kachina dance and ceremony that acknowledges the success of the Soyal Solstice Ceremony and shares its blessings with all of the community. The first kachina to appear is Soyal depicted as a shabbily dressed figure who totters along in the movements of an old man.
Soyal Solstice Ceremony - Kivas, Kachinas and Prayer Sticks
Kachina ceremonies are prepared with great care. The Kiva is a special sacred building, often built underground, in which the Peublos prepare for the kachinas including the Soyal Solstice Ceremony. The Kiva is symbolic of the fourth world, the home of the Kachina spirits. Prayer Sticks were prepared in the Kiva and used for various rituals, including the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, for calling forth spirits in the evocation of a prayer.
Soyal Solstice Ceremony - The Winter Solstice
Seasons are marked by the the turning of the sun on the solstices. The winter solstice has been marked as a time of great importance since the ancient times. The winter solstice signifies the the birth of the new year and the beginning of Winter. Many ancient ceremonies acknowledged the winter solstice including Yule, Christmas and Saturnalia which all occurred in mid December. The ancients were hunters and farmers and the seasons and weather played a vital role in their lives. Winter was often harsh and many people did not survive the winter season. Ceremonies and rituals such as the Soyal Solstice Ceremony were observed as a time to make offerings, prayers and powerful supplications to the spirits for protection.

Solstice Ceremonies and Dances
At the summer solstice, the sun rises north of East, its most northern point on the horizon. At the winter solstice, the sun rises south of east at its most southern position on the horizon. The Pueblo Indians have two cycles of ceremonies, the summer dances and the winter dances, that are performed to coincide with the Summer solstice and Winter solstice. The purpose of the summer solstice dance ceremonies is to bring rain for germinating the corn crops. The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is a supplication to the sun but other winter solstice dance ceremonies, such as the Buffalo and Deer Dance, are strongly associated with hunting, in which the Pueblo harmonize with the animal world by imitating animals in both dress and movement. Many of the dances feature kachinas, or the Pueblo clowns or Tricksters, called Koshare that are believed to be the spirits of the dead and as departed souls have the ability to intercede with the deities in behalf of the living. The equinoxes were less important than the solstices to most Pueblo cultures and not celebrated to the extent of the solstices. At each equinox, the Sun rises on the horizon due East and sets due West.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony

 

The Native American Soyal Solstice Ceremony ceremony. Discover facts and information about the culture of Native American Indians and their belief in the power of the Soyal Solstice Ceremony
The Soyal Solstice Ceremony

Definition of Soyal Solstice Ceremony: What is the Soyal Solstice Ceremony? The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is also called the Great Feast of the Winter Solstice and is celebrated by the Southwest Pueblo, Zuni and Hopi tribes of Native Americans. The Soyal solstice ceremony is held on December 21 which is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and marks the Winter Solstice. The purpose of the Soyal ceremony and ritual is to bring the sun back from its long winter slumber. The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is a major Hopi ceremony which is celebrated over a period of 16 days which starts with prayers and supplications and ends with a feast and Kachina Dance. The Native American name for this important ceremony is 'Soyalangwul' from which the term 'Soyal is derived.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony - The Sun Priest
The Pueblo Indians depended on accurate predictions of major astronomical events such as a solstice or equinox to allow them to prepare for important ceremonies, dances and rituals. The task of making accurate astronomical events, such as the summer and winter solstice, was assigned to the Sun Priest called the 'Cacique' by the Pueblo or the Pekwin by the Zuni.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony - Kachina Dances
The Southwestern Pueblo, Zuni and Hopi tribes celebrated the Great Feast of the Winter Solstice, the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, to turn the sun back toward its summer path and renew the life stages for the coming year. The Hopi and Zuni believe that the sun god has traveled the furthest distance from the tribe at the winter solstice, so warriors and other powerful members of the tribe were tasked to entice the sun back. They therefore performed Kachina dances as part of the Soyal Solstice Ceremony. A Kachina was powerful being or spirit who, if given due veneration and proper respect, could use their powers for the good and well being of the people, bringing rainfall, healing, fertility, or protection. There are more than 400 different types of kachina in the Pueblo culture, each holding different powers and influence. Kokopelli is the most famous of all the Kachina spirits. Kachina spirits are represented by dolls and emulated at ceremonies, called Kachinas, in which the participants wear masks and highly colorful costumes. The Great Feast of the Winter Solstice, the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, is a typical Kachina dance and ceremony that acknowledges the success of the Soyal Solstice Ceremony and shares its blessings with all of the community. The first kachina to appear is Soyal depicted as a shabbily dressed figure who totters along in the movements of an old man.
Soyal Solstice Ceremony - Kivas, Kachinas and Prayer Sticks
Kachina ceremonies are prepared with great care. The Kiva is a special sacred building, often built underground, in which the Peublos prepare for the kachinas including the Soyal Solstice Ceremony. The Kiva is symbolic of the fourth world, the home of the Kachina spirits. Prayer Sticks were prepared in the Kiva and used for various rituals, including the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, for calling forth spirits in the evocation of a prayer.
Soyal Solstice Ceremony - The Winter Solstice
Seasons are marked by the the turning of the sun on the solstices. The winter solstice has been marked as a time of great importance since the ancient times. The winter solstice signifies the the birth of the new year and the beginning of Winter. Many ancient ceremonies acknowledged the winter solstice including Yule, Christmas and Saturnalia which all occurred in mid December. The ancients were hunters and farmers and the seasons and weather played a vital role in their lives. Winter was often harsh and many people did not survive the winter season. Ceremonies and rituals such as the Soyal Solstice Ceremony were observed as a time to make offerings, prayers and powerful supplications to the spirits for protection.

Solstice Ceremonies and Dances
At the summer solstice, the sun rises north of East, its most northern point on the horizon. At the winter solstice, the sun rises south of east at its most southern position on the horizon. The Pueblo Indians have two cycles of ceremonies, the summer dances and the winter dances, that are performed to coincide with the Summer solstice and Winter solstice. The purpose of the summer solstice dance ceremonies is to bring rain for germinating the corn crops. The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is a supplication to the sun but other winter solstice dance ceremonies, such as the Buffalo and Deer Dance, are strongly associated with hunting, in which the Pueblo harmonize with the animal world by imitating animals in both dress and movement. Many of the dances feature kachinas, or the Pueblo clowns or Tricksters, called Koshare that are believed to be the spirits of the dead and as departed souls have the ability to intercede with the deities in behalf of the living. The equinoxes were less important than the solstices to most Pueblo cultures and not celebrated to the extent of the solstices. At each equinox, the Sun rises on the horizon due East and sets due West.

Soyal~the Native Yule

Ya Ta Say~


NATIVE AMERICAN SPIRITUALITY: 

The Pueblo tribe observe both the summer and winter solstices. Although the specific details of the rituals differ from pueblo to pueblo, "the rites are built around the sun, the coming new year and the rebirth of vegetation in the spring....Winter solstice rites include...prayerstick making, retreats, altars, emesis and prayers for increase." 
 
The Hopi tribe "is dedicated to giving aid and direction to the sun which is ready to 'return' and give strength to budding life." Their ceremony is called "Soyal." It lasts for 20 days and includes "prayerstick making, purification, rituals and a concluding rabbit hunt, feast and blessing..." 
 
There are countless stone structures created by Natives in the past to detect the solstices and equinoxes. One was called Calendar One by its modern-day finder. It is in a natural amphitheatre of about 20 acres in size in Vermont. From a stone enclosure in the center of the bowl, one can see a number of vertical rocks and natural features in the horizon which formed the edge of the bowl. At the solstices and equinoxes, the sun rises and sets at notches or peaks in the ridge which surrounded the calendar. 

The Indigenous People of the United States

Discover interesting facts and information about the history and culture of Native American Indians and their tribes

The Soyal Solstice Ceremony

Definition of Soyal Solstice Ceremony: What is the Soyal Solstice Ceremony? The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is also called the Great Feast of the Winter Solstice and is celebrated by the Southwest Pueblo, Zuni and Hopi tribes of Native Americans. The Soyal solstice ceremony is held on December 21 which is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and marks the Winter Solstice. The purpose of the Soyal ceremony and ritual is to bring the sun back from its long winter slumber. The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is a major Hopi ceremony which is celebrated over a period of 16 days which starts with prayers and supplications and ends with a feast and Kachina Dance. The Native American name for this important ceremony is 'Soyalangwul' from which the term 'Soyal is derived.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony - The Sun Priest
The Pueblo Indians depended on accurate predictions of major astronomical events such as a solstice or equinox to allow them to prepare for important ceremonies, dances and rituals. The task of making accurate astronomical events, such as the summer and winter solstice, was assigned to the Sun Priest called the 'Cacique' by the Pueblo or the Pekwin by the Zuni.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony - Kachina Dances
The Southwestern Pueblo, Zuni and Hopi tribes celebrated the Great Feast of the Winter Solstice, the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, to turn the sun back toward its summer path and renew the life stages for the coming year. The Hopi and Zuni believe that the sun god has traveled the furthest distance from the tribe at the winter solstice, so warriors and other powerful members of the tribe were tasked to entice the sun back. They therefore performed Kachina dances as part of the Soyal Solstice Ceremony. A Kachina was powerful being or spirit who, if given due veneration and proper respect, could use their powers for the good and well being of the people, bringing rainfall, healing, fertility, or protection. There are more than 400 different types of kachina in the Pueblo culture, each holding different powers and influence. Kokopelli is the most famous of all the Kachina spirits. Kachina spirits are represented by dolls and emulated at ceremonies, calledKachinas, in which the participants wear masks and highly colorful costumes. The Great Feast of the Winter Solstice, the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, is a typical Kachina dance and ceremony that acknowledges the success of the Soyal Solstice Ceremony and shares its blessings with all of the community. The first kachina to appear is Soyal depicted as a shabbily dressed figure who totters along in the movements of an old man.

Kachina Dancers
 

[Turkey Kachina] [Buffalo Kachina] [Mockingbird Kachina] [Owl Kachina] [Wasp Kachina]
Turkey Kachina Buffalo Kachina Mocking Bird Bird Kachina Wasp Kachina
[Owl Kachina] [Hummingbird Kachina] [Hawk Kachina] [Bee Kachina] [Snipe Kachina]
Owl Kachina Humming Bird Hawk Kachina Bee Kachina Snipe Kachina

Soyal Solstice Ceremony - Kivas, Kachinas and Prayer Sticks
Kachina ceremonies are prepared with great care. The Kiva is a special sacred building, often built underground, in which the Peublos prepare for the kachinas including the Soyal Solstice Ceremony. The Kiva is symbolic of the fourth world, the home of the Kachina spirits. Prayer Sticks were prepared in the Kiva and used for various rituals, including the Soyal Solstice Ceremony, for calling forth spirits in the evocation of a prayer.

Soyal Solstice Ceremony - The Winter Solstice
Seasons are marked by the the turning of the sun on the solstices. The winter solstice has been marked as a time of great importance since the ancient times. The winter solstice signifies the the birth of the new year and the beginning of Winter. Many ancient ceremonies acknowledged the winter solstice including Yule, Christmas and Saturnalia which all occurred in mid December. The ancients were hunters and farmers and the seasons and weather played a vital role in their lives. Winter was often harsh and many people did not survive the winter season. Ceremonies and rituals such as the Soyal Solstice Ceremony were observed as a time to make offerings, prayers and powerful supplications to the spirits for protection.

Solstice Ceremonies and Dances
At the summer solstice, the sun rises north of East, its most northern point on the horizon. At the winter solstice, the sun rises south of east at its most southern position on the horizon. The Pueblo Indians have two cycles of ceremonies, the summer dances and the winter dances, that are performed to coincide with the Summer solstice and Winter solstice. The purpose of the summer solstice dance ceremonies is to bring rain for germinating the corn crops. The Soyal Solstice Ceremony is a supplication to the sun but other winter solstice dance ceremonies, such as the Buffalo and Deer Dance, are strongly associated with hunting, in which the Pueblo harmonize with the animal world by imitating animals in both dress and movement. Many of the dances feature kachinas, or the Pueblo clowns or Tricksters, called Koshare that are believed to be the spirits of the dead and as departed souls have the ability to intercede with the deities in behalf of the living. The equinoxes were less important than the solstices to most Pueblo cultures and not celebrated to the extent of the solstices. At each equinox, the Sun rises on the horizon due East and sets due West.

 

 

Yule Correspondance & More

Yule, Winter Solstice - Table of Associations and Correspondences
 

   

Time of Day

Midnight, Nighttime, Dawn

Time of Life

Old Age, 70's-90's, Crone, Senior, Birth, 0-2 Years
Elemental Forces Earth, Snow, Fire, Tree

Decorations

Holly, Mistletoe, Colored Lights, Candles, Decorated Tree, Ornaments, Nativity Scenes, Boughs, Wreaths, Bells
Customs Caroling, Feasting, Nativity Plays, Sending Christmas Cards, Santa Claus, Gift Giving, Burning the Yule Log, Decorating a Christmas Tree, Ringing Bells

Fruits

Fruit Cakes, Nuts, Apples, Squash

Herbs

Rosemary, Frankincense, Bayberry, Mistletoe, Myrrh
Foods Turkey, Ham, Pies, Cranberries, Potatoes
Plants Fir, Pine, Holly, Mistletoe, Poinsettia, Oak, Pinecones
Minerals garnet, cat’s eye, ruby, diamond, bloodstone
Incense Pine, cedar, bayberry, cinnamon

Tools

Candles, Spinning Wheels, Saw, Axe

Goddesses

Bona Dea, Demeter, Ops, Brigid, Ameratasu, Beira (Queen of Winter), Frau Holle, Sarasvati, Lucia

Gods

Saturn, Kronos, Sol Invicta, Baby Mithras, Oak King, Jupiter, Baby Jesus Christ, Dagda, Baldur, Dionysus
Nature Spirits Santa Claus, Elves, Father Time, Green Man, Gnomes, Trolls  

Themes

Rebirth, Nativity, Birth, Generosity, Friendship

Farming Activities

Slaughtering Animals, Chopping Firewood, Indoor Crafts

Animals

Reindeer Stag, Robin, Turkey

Colors

pine green, snow white, heart red, gold

Sacred Circle (Valley Spirit)

North Pole, Green, Earth

Celebrations

 

 

Christmas  (Christians, Non-Christians, Secular)  
Winter Solstice (Wiccan, Druids, Neopagans)

[bullet]

DRUIDISM: Druids and Druidesses formed the professional class in ancient Celtic society. They performed the functions of modern day priests, teachers, ambassadors, astronomers, genealogists, philosophers, musicians, theologians, scientists, poets and judges. Druids led all public rituals, which were normally held within fenced groves of sacred trees. The solstice is the time of the death of the old sun and the birth of the dark-half of the year. It was called:

"Alban Arthuan by the ancient Druids. It is the end of month of the Elder Tree and the start of the month of the Birch. The three days before Yule is a magical time. This is the time of the Serpent Days or transformation...The Elder and Birch stand at the entrance to Annwn or Celtic underworld where all life was formed. Like several other myths they guard the entrance to the underworld. This is the time the Sun God journey's thru the underworld to learn the secrets of death and life. And bring out those souls to be reincarnated." 1

A modern-day Druid, Amergin Aryson, has composed a Druidic ritual for the Winter Solstice. 2
 

[bullet] INCA RELIGION: The ancient Incas celebrated a festival if Inti Raymi at the time of the Winter Solstice. Since the Inca Empire was mainly south of the equator, the festival was held in June. It celebrates "the Festival of the Sun where the god of the Sun, Wiracocha, is honored." 3 Ceremonies were banned by the Roman Catholic conquistadores in 1572 as part of their forced conversions of the Inca people to Christianity. A local group of Quecia Indians in Cusco, Peru revived the festival in 1944. It is now a major festival which begins in Cusco and proceeds to an ancient amphitheater a few miles away. 
 
[bullet] IRAN: Shabe-Yalda (a.k.a. Shab-e Yaldaa) is celebrated in Iran by followers of many religions. It originated in Zoroastrianism, the state religion which preceded Islam. The name refers to the birthday or rebirth of the sun. People gather at home around a korsee -- a low square table -- all night. They tell stories and read poetry. They eat watermelons, pomegranates and a special dried fruit/nut mix. Bonfires are lit outside. 4
 
[bullet] ISLAM: During the period 1997 to 1999, the first day of the Islamic lunar month of Ramadan occurred in December. The nominal dates were 1997-DEC-31, 1998-DEC-20 and 1999-DEC-9. In some countries, the actual date for the start of Ramadan depends upon the sighting of the crescent moon, and thus can be delayed by a few days from the nominal date. This is the holiest period in the Islamic year. It honors the lunar month in which the Qura'n was revealed by God to humanity. "It is during this month that Muslims observe the Fast of Ramadan. Lasting for the entire month, Muslims fast during the daylight hours and in the evening eat small meals and visit with friends and family. It is a time of worship and contemplation. A time to strengthen family and community ties." 5

Because Ramadan is part of a lunar-based calendar, it starts about 11 days earlier each year. In the year 2000, the nominal date was NOV-27. Ramadan is thus not associated with the winter solstice as are other religious celebrations. It is just by coincidence that it has occurred during December near the end of the 20th century. It will again be a December observation in the early 2030's
 

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JUDAISM: Jews celebrate an 8 day festival of Hanukkah, (a.k.a. Feast of Lights, Festival of lights, Feast of Dedication, Chanukah, Chanukkah, Hanukah). It recalls the war fought by the Maccabees in the cause of religious freedom. Antiochus, the king of Syria, conquered Judea in the 2nd century BCE. He terminated worship in the Temple and stole the sacred lamp, the menorah, from before the altar.  At the time of the solstice, they rededicated the Temple to a Pagan deity. Judah the Maccabee lead a band of rebels, and succeeding in retaking Jerusalem. They restored the temple and lit the menorah. It was exactly three years after the flame had been extinguished -- at the time of the Pagan rite. 

Although they had found only sufficient consecrated oil to last for 24 hours, the flames burned steadily for eight days.

"Today's menorahs have nine branches; the ninth branch is for the shamash, or servant light, which is used to light the other eight candles. People eat potato latkes, exchange gifts, and play dreidel games. And as they gaze at the light of the menorah, they give thanks for the miracle in the Temple long ago." 6

Modern-day Jews celebrate Hanukkah by lighting one candle for each of the eight days of the festival. Once a minor festival, it has been growing in importance in recent years, perhaps because of the popularity of Christmas.
 

[bullet] NATIVE AMERICAN SPIRITUALITY: 

[bullet] The Pueblo tribe observe both the summer and winter solstices. Although the specific details of the rituals differ from pueblo to pueblo, "the rites are built around the sun, the coming new year and the rebirth of vegetation in the spring....Winter solstice rites include...prayerstick making, retreats, altars, emesis and prayers for increase." 7
 
[bullet] The Hopi tribe "is dedicated to giving aid and direction to the sun which is ready to 'return' and give strength to budding life." Their ceremony is called "Soyal." It lasts for 20 days and includes "prayerstick making, purification, rituals and a concluding rabbit hunt, feast and blessing..." 7
 
[bullet] There are countless stone structures created by Natives in the past to detect the solstices and equinoxes. One was called Calendar One by its modern-day finder. It is in a natural amphitheatre of about 20 acres in size in Vermont. From a stone enclosure in the center of the bowl, one can see a number of vertical rocks and natural features in the horizon which formed the edge of the bowl. At the solstices and equinoxes, the sun rises and sets at notches or peaks in the ridge which surrounded the calendar. 8
 
 

BLYSSFUL MOON'S DAY PAGANS!

"Yule, is when the dark half of the year relinquishes to the light half.   Starting the next morning at sunrise, the sun climbs just a little higher and stays a little longer in the sky each day.  Known as Solstice Night, or the longest night of the year, much celebration was to be had as the ancestors awaited the rebirth of the Oak King, the Sun King, the Giver of Life that warmed the frozen Earth and made her to bear forth from seeds protected through the fall and winter in her womb.  Bonfires were lit in the fields, and crops and trees were "wassailed" with toasts of spiced cider."
"The Holly King, represents the Death aspect of the God at this time of year; and the Oak King, represents the opposite aspect of Rebirth (these roles are reversed at Midsummer).  This can be likened to the Divine Child's birth.  The myth of the Holly King/Oak King probably originated from the Druids to whom these two trees were highly sacred.  The Oak King (God of the Waxing Year) kills the Holly King (God of the Waning Year) at Yule (the Winter Solstice).  The Oak King then reigns supreme until Litha (the Summer Solstice) when the two battle again, this time with the Holly King victorious.  Examples of the Holly King's image can be seen in our modern Santa Claus."

"Timeless thoughts of a winter’s stare;

eyes gazing over a landscape bare. 
Memories drift on a blustery breeze;
dying light ushers in the freeze.
Reaching out for a grasp on the present;
stillness sets in, alone, and desolate.
Future unknown, outcome uncertain;
brilliance shadowed by a drawn curtain.
Path now set, laid before me known;
closing light now emanating from home.
Enter my homestead, heart filled with glee;
two eyes of the future peering upward at me.
Trusting in him to forge forward until fulfilled;
Basis of strength, values I have instilled.
A wary mind at last permitted to rest;
reflecting on the realization of how I am blessed.
-  Michael A. Barron, Winter's Epiphany   

General Preparations
Yule, Winter Solstice, Christmas, Saturnalia
 

1.  Thoroughly clean, dust, tidy up, refreshen, improve, and add appropriate seasonal decorations to your home altar.  This should normally be clean and tidy, however an extra cleaning before the Winter Solstice equinox celebration is a way to express your reverence, create a visible reminder of your thoughts and devotional practices, and to offer hospitality to the nature spirits, ancestors, and Shining Ones. If you don't have a home altar, read some books and webpages about setting one up in your home or garden, and then establish one this holiday season.  Typical Winter Solstice colors are green (pine/fir branches, wrapped presents), red (candles, cloth, bowls, poinsettia flowers, wrapped presents, ornaments, etc.), and white (candles, bowls, wrapped presents, ornaments). 

2.  Since cutting trees for firewood was an essential task for survival in the winter months, cutting a tree and bringing it indoors and decorating it with ornaments is quite popular in many places.  Of course, burn the tree afterwards in your fireplace along with your regular firewood.  If you have no fireplace, then bring a living potted evergreen plant indoors for a week or so and decorate it, or make a beautiful wreath out of pine branches.  Some people use trees and plants made out of plastic for Christmas decorations, and resuse them for decades.  A few view the "Christmas Tree" tradition as a insult to pagan and/or Christian views, ecologically unsound, and a wasteful clutter in landfill dumps.  Check to make sure your home heating system is efficient, doors and windows are draft free, and wear warm clothing indoors to conserve non-renewable resources. 

3.  Working and meditating in the garden is an important facet of my spiritual path.  I need to regularly reconnect with the earth and the winter season outdoors. I live in Red Bluff, California, USDA Zone 9, Northern Hemisphere.  My late December gardening chores might be quite different from yours, depending upon where you live.  We always have a winter vegetable garden: swiss chard, cabbage, onions, radishes, garlic.  Tend your garden daily.  Weed your vegetable garden.  Review your own lists of chores for December and January, and act accordingly.      

8.  Read about the Winter Solstice, Saturnalia, New Year, and Christmas celebrations around the world.  Add notes gathered from books, magazines, and webpages on the subject to your personal journal.  See my bibliography and links above.  Visit your local public library or college library to obtain access to books, media and magazines on the subject.  Study about ancient Indo-European religions.  I update my Months webpages on December and January. 

9.  Add some appropriate Winter Solstice, Saturnalia, Wintertime, New Year or Christmas songs, chants, prayers, reflections, invocations, or poems to your Neo-Pagan Craft Journal, Book of Shadows, blog, website, or Ritual Handbook.  Write in your personal journal.  Most spiritual seekers keep a notebook, journal or log as part of their experimental, creative, magical and experiential work. 

10.  Stay at home.  Improve your home, backyard, or garden.  Eliminate long driving trips.  Do you really need to "Go" anywhere?  Do you really need to fly by airplane to another country?  Explore your backyard, neighborhood, local community, nearby city, county wide area, regional area within 100 miles.  Visit a local "sacred site."  For us, for example, this could be Mt. Shasta, the headwaters spring of the Sacramento River in Mt. Shasta City, the Sacramento River at Woodson Bridge Park, a long walk in the forest below nearby Mt. Lassen, sitting on the shore of Almanor Lake, sitting in my backyard in the moonlight, or visiting a beautiful church or college or park that is nearby.  Watch a DVD on a spiritual subject, sacred place, or inspirational topic.  Learn more about your local environment. 

11.  Read solitary or group rites for the Winter Solstice available in books and webpages (see above).  Create your own ritual for the Winter Solstice or Christmas.  Practice the ritual.  Conduct the ritual at a convenient time for you, or your family and/or friends, as close to the day of the Winter Solstice as possible.  Attend a public Winter Solstice ritual of a local NeoPagan group. 

12.  We enjoy putting up a few colorful electric lights and turning them on for an hour or so every few nights.    

"The Oak King, the Lord of the Greenwood and golden twin of the waxing year, rules from Midwinter to Midsummer. At Midwinter, he goes to battle with his twin, the Holly King, for the favor of the Goddess. He slays the Holly King, who goes to rest in Caer Arianrhod until they do battle again at Midsummer. The Oak King and Holly King are mortal enemies at Midsummer and Midwinter, but they are two sides of a whole. Neither could exist without the other.    Two themes run throughout the Oak King and Holly King saga. The first, of course, is the two great yearly battles between the two. The second is the sacrificial mating, death, and resurrection of each in his season. At Beltane, the peak of the Oak King's reign, he sacrificially mates with the Great Mother, dies in her embrace, and is resurrected. This is an enactment of the natural fertility theme of the season, and is not uncommon in other mythologies: Osiris, Tammuz, Dionysus, Balder, and Jesus are only a few other gods who die and are resurrected. (The Holly King on the other hand, mates, dies and is resurrected at Lammas.) This aspect of the Oak King and Holly King is not widely discussed, but is an important element in their roles as fertility gods."
-  The Oak King  

 

 

"All paganism is at bottom a worship of nature in some form or other, and in all pagan religions the deepest and most awe-inspiring attribute of nature was its power of re-production. The mystery of birth and becoming was the deepest mystery of nature; it lay at the root of all thoughtful paganism, and appeared in various forms, some of a more innocent, others of a most debasing type. To ancient pagan thinkers, as well as to modern men of science, the key to the hidden secret of the origin and preservation of the universe lay in the mystery of sex. Two energies or agents, one an active and generative, other a feminine, passive, or susceptible one, were everywhere thought to combine for creative purposes; and heaven and earth sun and moon, day and night, were believed to co-operate to the production of being. Upon some such basis as this rested almost all the polytheistic worship of the old civilization; and to it may be traced back, by stage, the separation of divinity into male and female gods; the deification of distinct powers of nature, and the idealization of man's own faculties, desires, and lusts; where every power of his understanding was embodied as an object of adoration, and every impulse of his will became an incarnation of deity."
-   A.T. Jones, Ancient Sun Worship and Its Impact on Christianity

Be Blessed This Yule Solstice!

 

Candle Mini Magick Class~Week 2 Monday

WARNING! IF YOU ARE NOT REGISTERED HERE, DO NOT ENTER OR POST~THANK YOU

CANDLE MAGICK MINI CLASS

WEEK 2~STUDENT EDITION

Chapters 3 & 4

Pages 59~99

 

~Monday~Candlelight Spells & Charms~Prayers & Meditations~

Q #1

What is “color symbolism” and why is I important?

A:

 

Q #2

Name the fourteen symbolic colors in candles and what that color represents on full detail?

A:

 

Q #3

Does the “degree” of the color matter and if so why?

A:

 

Q #4

In carving and shaping candles, what type of magick does this represent?

A:

 

Q #5

Give me six examples from the text of shapes and how they are used?

 

Q #6

What is the purpose of “dressing & adorning” a candle ?

A:

 

Q # 7

Give me four examples from the text of adorning a candle?

A:

 

Q # 8

What is the purpose of “pinning” a candle?

A:

(note: I have used this process in healing and voodoo magick with many pins).

 

Q # 9

Although the text puts little importance in the timing of the candle, I do find some relevance to this process but not an exact science of hour and minute. Can you think of any situations where it is important to light a candle at a certain time?

A:

Student example.

Q # 10

Is it important to have quite time during a candle ritual, and if so why?

A:

 

Q # 11

What is the importance of lighting and burning a candle, give several examples?

A:

 

Video~http://youtu.be/ZXDbCcc_HuI

 

~CLASS DISCUSSION~

What is Feng Shui?

This is a simple question that can be difficult to answer.

Feng shui is an ancient art and science developed over 3,000 years ago in China. It is a complex body of knowledge that reveals how to balance the energies of any given space to assurehealth and good fortune for people inhabiting it. 

Feng means wind and shuimeans water . In Chinese culture wind and water are associated with good health, thus good feng shui came to mean good fortune, while bad feng shui means bad luck, or misfortune.

 

Feng shui is based on the Taoist vision and understanding of nature, particularly on the idea that the land is alive and filled with Chi , or energy. 

Explore the History of Feng Shui

The ancient Chinese believed that specific land's energy could either make or break the kingdom, so to speak. The theories ofyin and yang , as well as the five feng shuielements , are some of the basic aspects of a feng shui analysis that come from Taoism.

 

Taoism.

How To Get Started with Feng Shui

The main tools used in a feng shui analysis are the Compass and the Bagua. The feng shui energy map, or bagua , is an octagonal grid containing the symbols of the I Ching , the ancient oracle on which feng shui is based. Knowing the bagua of your home will help you understand the connection of specific feng shui areas of your home to specific areas of your life.

How To Apply the Bagua of Your Home or OfficeThe feng shui compass , also called Luo-Pan, is used to access deeper information about a site or a building. It consists of bands of concentric rings arranged around  Luo meanseverything and Pan means bowl , which can be interpreted as a bowl that contains all the mysteries of the universe.

How To Take the Compass Reading

Feng shui offers a variety of cures to improve your life. From the feng shui use of aquariums to attract prosperity to the feng shui use of crystals and fountains ; from the right feng shui use of colours to the feng shui use of clocks , there are many ways you can improve the energy in your home or office with solid, good feng shui. 

It is important to understand that there are several different schools of feng shui , as well as a strong culturally specific symbolic aspect of feng shui that you have to useintelligently . 

Once you master the basic level of feng shui, you will start seeing powerful results. You will also understand why feng shui is extensively used in both homes and officesall over the world. 

 

Getting started with feng shuifor your house & home can be easy when you start with the house basics and gradually move on to the more complex feng shui levels.

To help you get started with good feng shui in your home, here are some helpful feng shui house steps for beginners:

Clear Out Your Clutter, get rid of everything you do not love in your house. Clutter clearing is a time-and energy-consuming process that will feel like therapy, but it will help you "lighten up the load," so to speak.

Do not skip this step, as it is an essential one in creating harmonious house feng shui energy.

Easy Feng Shui To Clear House Clutter

House Clutter Clearing with Kids

How To Clutter Clear Your Closet

Have Good Quality Air and Good Quality Light in your house. These two elements are essential for good feng shui energy (called Chi) in your home. Open the windows often, introduce feng shui air-purifying plants or use an air-purifier. Allow as much natural light as possible into your home, and consider using full-spectrum lights.

3.Define the Bagua, or the feng shui energy map of your house, by using one of the two main feng shui methods - the classical school bagua or the BTB grid. Once you define the bagua, you will know which areas of your home are connected to specific areas of your life. For example, in traditional feng shui, the Southeast feng shui area of your home is connected to the flow of money energy in your life.

 

Get the Basics of 5 Feng Shui Elements in order to create balance and vibrant energy in all areas of your home. For example, if you are working on attractingmore prosperity, you will introduce the feng shui elements of Wood and Water in the Southeast area of your house. If your need to improve your health, you will place lush wood feng shui element items, such as plants or pieces of wood furniture in the East area.

 

Find Out Your Feng Shui Birth Elementand create a home to nourish and support your energy. For example, if your own element is Fire, you need to introduce the expressions of Fire feng shui element, such as the Fire element colors (red, orange, purple, magenta, pink, yellow), triangular shapes, etc.

You will also need a strong Wood element in your home, as Wood feeds the Fire in the productive cycle/relationship of five feng shui elements.

 

Find Out Your Kua Number and Your Lucky Directions so that you can be energized by good energy from your best, or lucky feng shui directions. Adjust the position of your bed, your desk, the seating in your dining area, etc. For example, if your Kua number is 1, it is best to face one of the following directions: Southeast, East, South, and North.

 

Always Be Mindful of the Feel of Your Home and how its energy influences your well-being. Make a habit of paying close attention to the so-called feng shui "trinity" that is deeply connected to your health - your bedroom, your bathroom and your kitchen. Nothing is static in the world of energy, so be wise and keep your home healthy and happy.

 

Here is the color correspondence of each of the five feng shui elements:

WOOD: Green, Brown

FIRE: Red, Strong Yellow, Orange, Purple, Pink

EARTH: Light Yellow, Sandy/Earthy, Light Brown

METAL: White, Gray

WATER: Blue, Black

Knowing how to use color to strengthen and balance the energy of your home is a complex feng shui subject, but there are always basics to it. The right placement of feng shui colors is defined by the Bagua, or the feng shui energy map of your space.

 

To help you understand how to best express the five feng shui elements in your home or office, let's look at the South feng shui bagua area.

The energy of the South feng shui bagua area is connected to your Fame & Reputation energy. A better translation, actually, is the Light, or Fire Within. The energy of the Southfeng shui bagua area is also connected to the image you project to other people, or your identity in the eyes of others, as well as to how well you are able to maintain your own Light - your identity and values.

The feng shui element of South is Fire, and the feng shui colors that express it are red,purple, pink, strong yellow and orange. Obviously, you want to keep your fire energy strong, which means it is best to avoid many blue or black color decor items in the South feng shui bagua area of your space.

Why would you avoid blue and black color scheme in the South bagua area? Because blue and black colors have the energy of the Water feng shui element, and Water puts down the Fire element of the South in the destructive cycle of five feng shui elements.

Here Are Some Easy Feng Shui Color Tips For Your Home:

 

Color Green is excellent for improving health and balancing family life when used in the East feng shui bagua area of your home.

 

Color Blue is a very good feng shui choice in the North bagua area to support the energy of your carrer growth or in the East (Health/Family) and Southeast (Wealth/Money) to water and nourish the Wood feng shui element.

 

Have some strong Yellow in the South feng shui bagua area for happy gatherings and good times.

 

Pure White in the West feng shui bagua area (Creativity & Children) will bring supportive energy for all your creative endeavors.

Before using specific colors in your home as feng shui cures, be sure to study the light patterns throughout the day in the room. Would the color feel good in the morning? How about at night with artificial lighting?

Be sure the chosen feng shui color has a good relationship with the other "inhabitants" of your home, such as your furniture pieces, decor objects, art, etc. You would like all of them to have a good time, rather than argue and continuously fight for your attention!

 

FENG SHUI 5 ELEMENTS ART STORE

The five elements theory is one of the main theories in feng shui. You can bring powerful, life-changing results by knowing how to apply the feng shui five elements theory in your home or office space. 

The five feng shui elements - Earth, Metal, Water, Wood and Fire - are the main manifestations of Chi, or Universal energy. One of the easiest ways to bring the energy of five elements into any space, be it home or office, is with good quality, vibrant art that carries the energy of specific elements. 

For example, if your space needs the Fire feng shui element, you can bring it with art that has strong red, purple, orange or yellow colours, in other words, with art that carries the energy of Fire feng shui element. Choose any style, period or representation that suits your home or office decor the best, no need to limit yourself. 
 

You can also bring the five feng shui elements with specific shapes, and here is how the feng shui elements are expressed in shapes:

WOOD: Rectangular

FIRE: Triangular

EARTH: Square

METAL: Round

WATER: Wavy

When you start applying the feng shui theory of five elements, you might be confused as to the feng shui element representation of a specific piece of furniture or a decor item.

In between color, shape and material, how would you define the feng shui element of a specific object?

Let's take the example of a coffee table - blue color, square shape, made from wood. Bluebeing the color of the water feng shui element, would your table be bringing the water element into your home or would it bring the wood element, as the table is made from wood? And how about the square shape, does it bring the earth feng shui element?

Generally, when you have difficulty defining the feng shui element of a specific decor item,the color of the item will be used as the first criteria. Second comes the shape, and then the material from which the item is made.

Of course, when the element is obvious, such as a metal staircase (metal element) or aplant (wood element), there is no guesswork! In most cases, though, you will see that each decor item brings two or more elements, and in time you will find it easier to sense, or understand, the feng shui element expression of various items in your home.

Once you know how to balance the five elements in your home by using simple decoritems, as well as various feng shui cures, a harmonious home is truly yours to enjoy!

 

Blyssful Saturn's Day Stargazers~In the Stars for December 6th, 2014

Full Moon (waning/180-135 degrees)
December 6, 2014 — A veil of self-absorption is lifted and suddenly you gain access to an unbiased view of others. This is a rare moment when you can see yourself objectively and become aware of whether or not what you want in your heart is actually beginning to manifest in your life. Traditionally, the Full Moon phase stirs emotion, and this is because when you "see" what is happening, you may become upset if you’re experiencing the "same ol', same ol'" -- rather than the things you would like. If the Full Moon phase is a disappointment, on the next New Moon it's time to take creative action in the direction of your dreams.

Moon 12° Gemini sextiles Uranus [in retrograde] 12° Aries
Moon 13° Gemini opposes Mercury 13° Sagittarius
Moon 14° Gemini opposes Sun 14° Sagittarius
Full Moon 12:30pm UK - 1:30pm Europe - 6pm India
7:30am USA EST - 11:30pm Sydney, Australia
Moon rises approx 5pm in your local time zone

Gemini Full Moon 6th December 2014
Changing Your Mind - Changing Your Life
The Gemini Full Moon will show you "life" from a different perspective that will make everyone change their minds
You won't care about "logic" - all you will want is whatever fires you up - whatever excites you - wherever there is warmth
Moon opposes Mercury | Moon opposes Sun - Full Moon | Moon opposes Venus
Means that it will be a vibrant Full Moon filled with lots of surprises.
 
Full Moon 14° Gemini - defined by 3 opposing energies that will be inexplicably attracted to each other - like magnets - means even if you think nothing is going to happen - it will be happening - ONE SPECIFIC POSITIVE thing in everyone's lives will get the full attention of this Gemini Full Moon.
 
Sun, Mercury & Venus in Fire signs opposing a Moon in communicative Air sign of Gemini - backed-up by Uranus in Fire Sign of Aries & Jupiter in Fire Sign of Leo. With the most significant breakthrough coming just prior to the Full Moon - due to the fact that Moon squares Neptune and Sun squares Neptune - which means to have your specific success and to have your breakthrough - you will need to change your attitude to specific facets of your life - and CHANGE YOUR MIND - defined by a newfound clarity of TRUTH - TRUTH of feelings, facts, events and situations - because the Full Moon will fire-you-up inside telling you that it's truly good for you - because it has made you come ALIVE.
 
It is "lucky" that last month Sun in Scorpio was so "dead", quiet and negative for most - because now - we will become so excited by every single exciting positive Sagittarian energy. That all the negativity will be completely forgotten. It will make you forget the sadness of the fact someone has died - because of the unexpected inheritance they have left for you.
Even so the journey from the New Moon in Sagittarius on 22nd November leading to this Full Moon of 6th December - has been vitally important as you realized what's been fundamentally - so bad for you - because it's been so negative as it created so much stagnation in your life. And I'm not just talking of the past few months - but even years. That's now completely changed due to the fact that Saturn is now headed out of Scorpio and into Sagittarius - even so and before then - the Gemini Full Moon still has many BIG surprises in store for everyone.
 
There's a facet of Gemini - which I should tell you - if you don't already know - and that's Gemini's like to love everyone - they like to be friends with everyone - and will always swap-sides in arguments - because they'd prefer to avoid confrontation. Equally so - they prefer to LIE than tell the TRUTH - as they don't want to upset anyone.
However, there are moments when even Gemini's tell the truth - and there are specific people that even Gemini's always tell the truth to - and this Gemini Full Moon will be one of them - people will not only tell you truth - but it will create a BOND of trust and friendship between you. That's because the truth will become so clear - that doubts, dithering, deception and lies won't be possible. Therefore, expect to find out the TRUTH - due to the squares to Neptune in Pisces - you will have no doubts anymore - the Full Moon truths will ensure you make all the right decisions for your future.
 
The Gemini Full Moon will affect - each star sign differently - for those who love changes and for those of you who hate unexpected changes - all you need to know is that the Full Moon will be creating the vitally necessary changes - that need to happen - to ensure you're moved into place in time for Saturn entering Sagittarius on 23rd December 2014.
 
This is the last Full Moon with "Saturn in Scorpio" - and therefore - certain things that need to be completed by 22nd December - will now be triggered to happen - as EVERYONE is opened - to get the karmic feeling that something needs to be completed - something needs to be tidied - and something needs to be prepared for the "future". It is coincidentally funny that this Full Moon will give everyone the inexplicable feeling to finish all unfinished business by "Christmas 2014". A feeling of just "finish" it - will be strongly felt - and hence even people who've been extremely stubborn - will now become flexible to finish and do what destiny wants them to do.

Be Blessed )O( 

Daily Fortunes for Saturn's Day December 6th, 2014

 

The tension between satisfying our most immediate needs and pursuing our future goals is amplified by the restless Gemini Full Moon at 7:26 am EST. The far-reaching Sagittarius Sun illuminates the Moon, testing our authenticity since we might not say what we believe. Our emotions can shift quickly, but our opinions remain more constant. Nevertheless, we crave interpersonal connections and yearn to indulge in the joy of exchanging ideas.

Aries Horoscope
(Mar 21 – Apr 19)
Your ideas are bubbling up to the surface and are demanding expression today as the chatty Gemini Full Moon casts its bright light in your 3rd House of Communication. It’s almost as if your thoughts have a mind of their own and that their intentions are more urgent than anything else. It might seem as if you don’t have a lot of choice in the matter now. Find a way to share what you are thinking with the rest of the world if you want to be at peace with yourself.

Taurus Horoscope
(Apr 20 – May 20)
Although you may not feel like dealing with financial concerns today, it’s wise to attend to money matters anyhow with the clever Gemini Full Moon highlighting your 2nd House of Personal Resources. At the very least, make sure your bills are paid before you purchase a luxury item. Keep in mind that not everyone is impressed with things that glitter and sparkle if the sentiments are insincere. The best gifts are the ones that come from the heart and not the wallet.

Gemini Horoscope
(May 21 – Jun 20)
You’re on an emotional edge while the Gemini Full Moon rattles your restless sign, especially if you recently made personal commitments that you’re now reconsidering. You can sense the pull of your own desires, but it might be hard to put your inner process into action today. Your vulnerability leaves you slightly uncomfortable, tempting you to run away from a complicated romantic involvement. Nevertheless, your feelings are in a state of flux. Getting out of your head and into your heart puts things into proper perspective.

Cancer Horoscope
(Jun 21 – Jul 22)
You are adaptable like a colorful chameleon as you absorb the energy of today’s mutable Gemini Full Moon floating in your 12th House of Spiritual Mystery. Your current emotional high tide bounces you around on the waves of change, but others may not notice right away. Instead of holding your dreams inside, reveal a secret to someone close to you. Expressing your feelings might seem scary at first, but can open the door to a tender and meaningful experience.

Leo Horoscope
(Jul 23 – Aug 22)
You secretly long for quality one-on-one time with a significant other now instead of getting lost in the noise of a larger group. Although you might like the idea of shifting the spotlight off of you for a while, it’s challenging to maintain anonymity when the interactive Gemini Full Moon highlights your 11th House of Social Networking. You may need to rearrange your schedule today so you can have a heart-to-heart conversation with your trusted companion without feeling the need to rationalize your desires. The heart wants what it wants.

Virgo Horoscope
(Aug 23 – Sep 22)
You’re being pulled in two directions now, making it tough to choose a single course of action. The Gemini Full Moon brightens your 10th House of Career, reinforcing your recent ambiguity about work. Meanwhile, personal activities or projects at home could distract you from professional responsibilities. Postpone major decisions for a few days until you have the time to think through your plans in a more rational manner. Make whatever necessary adjustments you must today, but don’t settle for less in the long run.

Libra Horoscope
(Sep 23 – Oct 22)
Sudden waves of wanderlust compel you to dream about going somewhere far away as the flighty Gemini Full Moon buzzes your 9th House of Adventure today. However, the Moon is offset by the Sun in your 3rd House of Immediate Environment, giving you good reasons to stay close to home. Don’t worry if you can’t resolve your current travel dilemma immediately. Daydreaming about an incredible journey from the comfort of your couch may be less stressful now than dragging your suitcase around the world.

Scorpio Horoscope
(Oct 23 – Nov 21)
You might think that you picked the easier path, only to discover that the Gemini Full Moon’s presence in your 8th House of Deep Sharing has drawn you into a complicated emotional entanglement. Thankfully, you are able to quickly reestablish a healthy perspective; your persuasive communication skills come to your aid today as you extricate yourself as gracefully as possible from any unnecessary drama. Remember, it’s your choice; only you can decide where you want to direct your energy now.

Sagittarius Horoscope
(Nov 22 – Dec 21)
You Archers are aiming your intentions into the distance as you dream and scheme your way into the future. Naturally, you wish that nothing was standing in your way, but you still may need to stop and consider someone else’s point of view now. Today’s Gemini Full Moon activates your 7th House of Partners, suggesting the presence of an unseen aspect of a relationship that complicates your current plans. Don’t make any big decisions until you share your thoughts with those you love. Although you cherish your independence, the opinions of others matter more than you think.

Capricorn Horoscope
(Dec 22 – Jan 19)
You may have so many little chores to do today that you don’t know where to begin. The Gemini Full Moon spotlights your 6th House of Daily Routine, spreading your energy thin and making it difficult to follow through on any single task. Luckily, your imagination helps to co-create your future. Don’t worry if you’re feeling frustrated because of your lack of progress; you will soon regain your focus and continue on your path. In the meantime, keep your dreams alive at all costs.

Aquarius Horoscope
(Jan 20 – Feb 18)
Actions usually speak louder than words, but communicating your feelings now is the most direct way to connect with others. Although today’s whimsical Gemini Full Moon lights up your 5th House of Love and Creativity, don’t get distracted by witty phrases and clever comebacks. Hold onto your vision of what you want to say and keep returning to the essential point so that your message is heard loud and clear. Even if you are tempted to move on to something else, persistence is your secret weapon of success.

Pisces Horoscope
(Feb 19 – Mar 20)
Although you might try to maintain your control of the outer world, the thoughtful Gemini Full Moon shines in your 4th House of Security, drawing you into the inner recesses of your private emotional world. However, you may find yourself cast in a social spotlight. Figuring out how to be in both places at once is more complicated than you might think. You prefer to hang out with your loved ones but responsibility calls and you must answer. The sooner you meet your obligations today, the quicker you can return to enjoying the company of your friends and family.

Today’s Witches Rune~The Moon

Keywords: Change.

Meanings: The “x” marks represent the four main phases of the moon and so you can expect changes to happen within the next 28 days. This is a particularly feminine stone and often appears in response to questions about women’s issues. The Moon rune is a messenger. It is telling you to be aware that major changes are coming to your life. Consult the runes closest to it to determine whether those changes are negative or positive.

Viking Rune~Hagalaz

Hagalaz is the hail Rune. It denotes chaos, destruction and disruption on a primal level. You may experience delays in moving toward your goals.

hagalaz : hail
Phonetic equivalent: h

DIVINATORY MEANINGS:
sudden loss, ordeal, destruction, disaster, clearance, testing, karmic lesson, drastic change.
MAGICAL USES:
removing unwanted influences, breaking destructive patterns
ASSOCIATED MYTHS & DEITIES:
Ragnarok, Loki, Frost Giants
ANALYSIS:
The idea of the destruction of the old being necessary to the growth of the new, as contained in the Norse myth of Ragnarok, is essential to our understanding of this rune. Interestingly enough, hagalaz lies between kenaz (fire) and isa (ice), reminding us of the Norse creation myth and the creative potential that lies between these two opposites, even though their meeting may seem at first to be destructive. Like the Tower in the Tarot, hagalaz is only a negative rune if we choose to view it in that way, and refuse to learn its lessons. Appearing as it does at the beginning of the second aett, it marks both a beginning and an end, and knocks us out of the safety and complacency of wunjo. It represents what a friend of mine used to refer to as the ‘flying ladle syndrome’ – that whenever things appear to be going too well, you can expect a good, healthy whack in the head from the Fates, just to make sure you’re paying attention.These sorts of ‘wake-up calls’ from the Gods will happen frequently throughout a person’s life, but are often misinterpreted as divine punishment for some imagined wrong when in fact they are merely a way of drawing your attention to a recurrent pattern in your life. Unfortunately, these types of events have a tendency to repeat themselves with greater and greater severity until the lesson is learned and the pattern is broken. For example, someone who needs to break their dependency on a certain type of person will find themselves in relationships with such people over and over again with more and more disastrous results until they recognize the pattern as emanating from themselves and break it willingly.

Tarot~The World

What has traditionally been known as the World card points to the presiding intelligence, called "Sophia," or Wisdom, which upholds life on this and all worlds. A more precise title for this card might be "the Soul of the World," also applicable as a symbol of personal empowerment and freedom. In most Tarot decks it is a female figure that has become our standard World image. She originates in Hebrew, Gnostic and Alchemical lore, and stands between heaven and earth as the Cosmic Mother of Souls, the Wife of God and our protector from the karmic forces we have set loose upon the Earth in our immaturity and ignorance.

Where the Empress energy secures and fertilizes our terrestrial lives, the goddess of The World invites us into cosmic citizenship -- once we come to realize our soul's potential for it. Just as the Chariot stands for success in achieving a separate Self, and Temperance represents achievement of mental and moral health, the World card announces the awakening of the soul's Immortal Being, accomplished without the necessity of dying.

This card, like the Sun, is reputed to have no negative meaning no matter where or how it appears. If the Hermetic axiom is "Know Thyself", this image represents what becomes known when the true nature of Self is followed to creative freedom and its ultimate realization.

Be Blessed )O(

[Daily Fortunes for Saturn's Day December 6th, 2014 The tension between satisfying our most immediate needs and pursuing our future goals is amplified by the restless Gemini Full Moon at 7:26 am EST. The far-reaching Sagittarius Sun illuminates the Moon, testing our authenticity since we might not say what we believe. Our emotions can shift quickly, but our opinions remain more constant. Nevertheless, we crave interpersonal connections and yearn to indulge in the joy of exchanging ideas. Aries Horoscope (Mar 21 – Apr 19) Your ideas are bubbling up to the surface and are demanding expression today as the chatty Gemini Full Moon casts its bright light in your 3rd House of Communication. It’s almost as if your thoughts have a mind of their own and that their intentions are more urgent than anything else. It might seem as if you don’t have a lot of choice in the matter now. Find a way to share what you are thinking with the rest of the world if you want to be at peace with yourself. Taurus Horoscope (Apr 20 – May 20) Although you may not feel like dealing with financial concerns today, it’s wise to attend to money matters anyhow with the clever Gemini Full Moon highlighting your 2nd House of Personal Resources. At the very least, make sure your bills are paid before you purchase a luxury item. Keep in mind that not everyone is impressed with things that glitter and sparkle if the sentiments are insincere. The best gifts are the ones that come from the heart and not the wallet. Gemini Horoscope (May 21 – Jun 20) You’re on an emotional edge while the Gemini Full Moon rattles your restless sign, especially if you recently made personal commitments that you’re now reconsidering. You can sense the pull of your own desires, but it might be hard to put your inner process into action today. Your vulnerability leaves you slightly uncomfortable, tempting you to run away from a complicated romantic involvement. Nevertheless, your feelings are in a state of flux. Getting out of your head and into your heart puts things into proper perspective. Cancer Horoscope (Jun 21 – Jul 22) You are adaptable like a colorful chameleon as you absorb the energy of today’s mutable Gemini Full Moon floating in your 12th House of Spiritual Mystery. Your current emotional high tide bounces you around on the waves of change, but others may not notice right away. Instead of holding your dreams inside, reveal a secret to someone close to you. Expressing your feelings might seem scary at first, but can open the door to a tender and meaningful experience. Leo Horoscope (Jul 23 – Aug 22) You secretly long for quality one-on-one time with a significant other now instead of getting lost in the noise of a larger group. Although you might like the idea of shifting the spotlight off of you for a while, it’s challenging to maintain anonymity when the interactive Gemini Full Moon highlights your 11th House of Social Networking. You may need to rearrange your schedule today so you can have a heart-to-heart conversation with your trusted companion without feeling the need to rationalize your desires. The heart wants what it wants. Virgo Horoscope (Aug 23 – Sep 22) You’re being pulled in two directions now, making it tough to choose a single course of action. The Gemini Full Moon brightens your 10th House of Career, reinforcing your recent ambiguity about work. Meanwhile, personal activities or projects at home could distract you from professional responsibilities. Postpone major decisions for a few days until you have the time to think through your plans in a more rational manner. Make whatever necessary adjustments you must today, but don’t settle for less in the long run. Libra Horoscope (Sep 23 – Oct 22) Sudden waves of wanderlust compel you to dream about going somewhere far away as the flighty Gemini Full Moon buzzes your 9th House of Adventure today. However, the Moon is offset by the Sun in your 3rd House of Immediate Environment, giving you good reasons to stay close to home. Don’t worry if you can’t resolve your current travel dilemma immediately. Daydreaming about an incredible journey from the comfort of your couch may be less stressful now than dragging your suitcase around the world. Scorpio Horoscope (Oct 23 – Nov 21) You might think that you picked the easier path, only to discover that the Gemini Full Moon’s presence in your 8th House of Deep Sharing has drawn you into a complicated emotional entanglement. Thankfully, you are able to quickly reestablish a healthy perspective; your persuasive communication skills come to your aid today as you extricate yourself as gracefully as possible from any unnecessary drama. Remember, it’s your choice; only you can decide where you want to direct your energy now. Sagittarius Horoscope (Nov 22 – Dec 21) You Archers are aiming your intentions into the distance as you dream and scheme your way into the future. Naturally, you wish that nothing was standing in your way, but you still may need to stop and consider someone else’s point of view now. Today’s Gemini Full Moon activates your 7th House of Partners, suggesting the presence of an unseen aspect of a relationship that complicates your current plans. Don’t make any big decisions until you share your thoughts with those you love. Although you cherish your independence, the opinions of others matter more than you think. Capricorn Horoscope (Dec 22 – Jan 19) You may have so many little chores to do today that you don’t know where to begin. The Gemini Full Moon spotlights your 6th House of Daily Routine, spreading your energy thin and making it difficult to follow through on any single task. Luckily, your imagination helps to co-create your future. Don’t worry if you’re feeling frustrated because of your lack of progress; you will soon regain your focus and continue on your path. In the meantime, keep your dreams alive at all costs. Aquarius Horoscope (Jan 20 – Feb 18) Actions usually speak louder than words, but communicating your feelings now is the most direct way to connect with others. Although today’s whimsical Gemini Full Moon lights up your 5th House of Love and Creativity, don’t get distracted by witty phrases and clever comebacks. Hold onto your vision of what you want to say and keep returning to the essential point so that your message is heard loud and clear. Even if you are tempted to move on to something else, persistence is your secret weapon of success. Pisces Horoscope (Feb 19 – Mar 20) Although you might try to maintain your control of the outer world, the thoughtful Gemini Full Moon shines in your 4th House of Security, drawing you into the inner recesses of your private emotional world. However, you may find yourself cast in a social spotlight. Figuring out how to be in both places at once is more complicated than you might think. You prefer to hang out with your loved ones but responsibility calls and you must answer. The sooner you meet your obligations today, the quicker you can return to enjoying the company of your friends and family. Today’s Witches Rune~The Moon Keywords: Change. Meanings: The “x” marks represent the four main phases of the moon and so you can expect changes to happen within the next 28 days. This is a particularly feminine stone and often appears in response to questions about women’s issues. The Moon rune is a messenger. It is telling you to be aware that major changes are coming to your life. Consult the runes closest to it to determine whether those changes are negative or positive. Viking Rune~Hagalaz Hagalaz is the hail Rune. It denotes chaos, destruction and disruption on a primal level. You may experience delays in moving toward your goals. hagalaz : hail Phonetic equivalent: h DIVINATORY MEANINGS: sudden loss, ordeal, destruction, disaster, clearance, testing, karmic lesson, drastic change. MAGICAL USES: removing unwanted influences, breaking destructive patterns ASSOCIATED MYTHS & DEITIES: Ragnarok, Loki, Frost Giants ANALYSIS: The idea of the destruction of the old being necessary to the growth of the new, as contained in the Norse myth of Ragnarok, is essential to our understanding of this rune. Interestingly enough, hagalaz lies between kenaz (fire) and isa (ice), reminding us of the Norse creation myth and the creative potential that lies between these two opposites, even though their meeting may seem at first to be destructive. Like the Tower in the Tarot, hagalaz is only a negative rune if we choose to view it in that way, and refuse to learn its lessons. Appearing as it does at the beginning of the second aett, it marks both a beginning and an end, and knocks us out of the safety and complacency of wunjo. It represents what a friend of mine used to refer to as the ‘flying ladle syndrome’ – that whenever things appear to be going too well, you can expect a good, healthy whack in the head from the Fates, just to make sure you’re paying attention.These sorts of ‘wake-up calls’ from the Gods will happen frequently throughout a person’s life, but are often misinterpreted as divine punishment for some imagined wrong when in fact they are merely a way of drawing your attention to a recurrent pattern in your life. Unfortunately, these types of events have a tendency to repeat themselves with greater and greater severity until the lesson is learned and the pattern is broken. For example, someone who needs to break their dependency on a certain type of person will find themselves in relationships with such people over and over again with more and more disastrous results until they recognize the pattern as emanating from themselves and break it willingly. Tarot~The World What has traditionally been known as the World card points to the presiding intelligence, called "Sophia," or Wisdom, which upholds life on this and all worlds. A more precise title for this card might be "the Soul of the World," also applicable as a symbol of personal empowerment and freedom. In most Tarot decks it is a female figure that has become our standard World image. She originates in Hebrew, Gnostic and Alchemical lore, and stands between heaven and earth as the Cosmic Mother of Souls, the Wife of God and our protector from the karmic forces we have set loose upon the Earth in our immaturity and ignorance. Where the Empress energy secures and fertilizes our terrestrial lives, the goddess of The World invites us into cosmic citizenship -- once we come to realize our soul's potential for it. Just as the Chariot stands for success in achieving a separate Self, and Temperance represents achievement of mental and moral health, the World card announces the awakening of the soul's Immortal Being, accomplished without the necessity of dying. This card, like the Sun, is reputed to have no negative meaning no matter where or how it appears. If the Hermetic axiom is "Know Thyself", this image represents what becomes known when the true nature of Self is followed to creative freedom and its ultimate realization. Be Blessed )O(]

Types of Witches

 

By Donna Morgan on Friday, December 5, 2014 at 9:43pm

Many people will have their opinions on what a Witch is. We were Shamans, Druids, Wise Women & Men, Healers & Heathens, Lovers of Mother Earth. With the birth of Christianity was also very near the death of Witchcraft, Wicca & Paganism alike. Some religions will preach to you that a witch is “evil” and “satanic”, and only perform magic for ill intent or to harm someone, because this is how they were “conditioned” from a young age. As all Wiccans know there is no such thing as Satan the Devil or Evil for that matter, these are things created and believed by Christians.

There are positive people and there are negative people, “it’s the law of attraction” if you behave negatively – then you attract negativity, (and visa versa), it’s physics – that’s what I believe. I categorize people in that way, I don’t care what religion you are – it’s how you behave and treat others, yourself, and this precious earth we ALL live on.

 

 

Wicca: A modern Pagan religion with spiritual roots in the earliest expressions of reverence for nature. Some major identifying motifs are: reverence for both the Goddess and God; acceptance of reincarnation and magick; ritual observance of astronomical and agricultural phenomena; and the use of magickal circles for ritual purposes.

 

Witch:   A practitioner of folk magick, particularly that kind relating to herbs, stones, colors, wells, rivers, etc. It is used by some Wiccans to describe themselves. This term has nothing to do with Satanism.

 

Witchcraft:  Witchcraft is a Pagan folk – religion of personal experience. The craft of the witch – magick, especially magick utilizing personal power in conjunction with the energies within stones, herbs, colors, and other natural objects. This belief system also has nothing to do with Satanism.

Pagan/Neo-Pagan/Paganism:   General term for followers of Wicca and other magickal, shamanistic, and polytheistic Earth-based religions. Also used to refer to pre-Christian religious and Spiritual belief systems.

 

Kitchen Witch: (aka – cottage witch & hearth witch)Of the Hearth & Home, mainly dealing with practical sides of the Wiccan / Pagan religion, magick, gemstones, the elements and the earth. A Kitchen Witch is usually recognized as practicing Celtic Wicca: Goes by the elements, the Ancient Ones and nature. They are usually healers or respect them highly. They work with plants, stones, flowers, trees, the elemental people, the gnomes and the fairies. But most of all a Kitchen Witch performs her magick in the Kitchen and has Goddess given talents for food crafting.

 

Green Witch:Is the practice of nature-based and earth oriented witchcraft, drawing on the folklore, folk religion and folk magic of ancient cultures as they connected to the forest; such as the tree worship of Druids, the kitchen craft of Italian witches or the keeping of sacred groves as presented in Gallic paganism. Green witches usually practice a traditional form of witchcraft in which the earth, trees, herbs, plants and flowers are consulted for their medicinal and magical value. They will grow their own herbs or Wildcraft them, and are very good at making herbal remedies. Belief in deities depends on the individual witch, though many Green witches acknowledge and earth mother or series of nature spirits as their deity. Usually, the spirits of nature, the dead (that of humans and animals) or the Fey have a large part in Green traditions. A form of green witchcraft which is better classified as Green Wicca was popularized by Ann Moura.

 

Hedge Witch:Hedge craft is a path that is somewhat shamanic in nature, (sometimes referred to as wise man & wise woman) as they are practitioners of an Earth-based spirituality. These are the ones who engage in spirit flight and journey into the Other world. They can, in this capacity, be very powerful midwives and healers. A bird of one kind or another is usually associated with the Hedge Witch, most commonly the raven and the goose. The term “hedge” signified the boundary of the village and represents the boundary that exists between this world and the spiritual realm. (they are said to be Night travelers or walkers on the wind) Their main function is mediator between the spirits and people. They may also work as a herbal healer or midwife. Some claim it to be the continuation of the practices of the cunning folk and wise-women, while others say that it is a modern tradition.

 

Eclectic Witch An individual approach in which the witch picks and chooses from many different traditions and creates a personalized form of witchcraft that meets their individual needs and abilities. They do not follow a particular religion or tradition, but study and learn from many different systems and use what works best for them.

 

 Neopagan:Modern practices identified by their practitioners as “witchcraft” have arisen in the twentieth century, generally portrayed as revivals of pre-Christian European magic and spirituality. They thus fall within the broad category of Neopaganism. Contemporary witchcraft takes many forms, but often involves the use of divination, magic, and working with the classical elements and unseen forces such as spirits and the forces of nature. The practice of herbal and folk medicine and spiritual healing is also common, as are alternative medical and New Age healing practices.

 

 Satanic Witch: Does not exist. Why? Witches don’t believe in Satan remember? Unlike most of the worlds major religions, Wiccans don’t believe that the body or the earth is evil or sinful. What this may refer to is Black Magic (the dark arts) (demonology) that traditionally uses supernatural powers for evil and selfish purposes, and often performing rituals for putting a curse or hex on someone. Black magic is a corruption or misuse of Witchcraft using it to be self-serving or destructive ends without regard for the cultural morals of the religion. It can be as simple as wishing something bad would happen to another, to a complex ritual. This “dark art” that I have explained is what most of us Wiccan’s get stereotyped or labelled as being. Let’s hope some of these people are smart enough to read about what a Wiccan and Witchcraft really is, and educate themselves a bit!

Candle Rituals


CANDLE RITUALS

Candle rituals have been around for centuries. You light the candles, maybe close your eyes while repeating a spell or that which you wish for and visualizing it coming true. It is a combination of the need or desire, and the ability to visualize the outcome.

Candle burning spells and rituals are very easy to do and to have success with if they are done correctly and you truly believe. The different colors of candles each have their own symbolism.

Here is a table of the colors and their meanings.

White: truth, purity

Red: love, health, sex, strength

Green: money, luck, fertility

Black: discord, evil, negativity, confusion

Brown: neutrality, uncertainty, hesitation

Pink: love, morality, honor

Purple: power, business progress, ambition

Orange: attraction, stimulation

Greenish Yellow: jealousy, anger, discord

Gray: neutrality, stalemate, negativity

Light Blue: tranquility, patience, health

Dark Blue: depression, changeability

Candle spells can be very easy or complicated. It all depends on how much time you want to put into a ritual. It can be as simple as lighting a green candle and chanting... money money come to me.

It can also be very long and complicated lasting several days with the repositioning of the candles each day. The choice is always yours.

The first thing you want to do is get the appropriate color candles for your particular desire.

Then you need to anoint the candle with oil. Olive oil will do fine. You need to rub the candle with the oil from the middle outward to the ends. As you are doing this you need to be thinking of your desired goal. Then sit and meditate on your desire after lighting the candles, then read your spell or chant your appropriate mantra.

You don't need some elaborate spell with a bunch of big words or words you don't even know how to pronounce. You can make your own spells or rituals. Think of your desire then make a simple little rhyme that tells about your desire in it. It doesn't even have to rhyme. This is all about will power, the power of positive thinking, and creative visualization. If you can do these things then you will send those vibrations out into the universe and eventually they will materialize. 

Nyx~Goddess of the Night

Goddess Of The Night~Nyx

 

 

 

Nyx, Goddess of the Night

Submitted by: swampy

“Black-winged Night,
Into the bosom of the rebus dark and deep,
Laid a wind-born egg, and as the seasons rolled
Forth sprang Love,
the longed for,
shining,
with wings of gold.” (Aristophanes)

Nyx is pivotal in the creation myth of the theology of the Orphic-Dionysic Mysteries. The ancients believed that before the universe was created there existed only a void of chaos that was black and silent. From this chaos rose the first deity, Nyx, also called Mother Night. She is said to have been in the form of a great black winged spirit. Nyx then conceived of the wind and laid a silver egg in the darkness. The upper part of the egg was the sky and the lower section was the earth.

Nyx actually came from the earliest times of Greek mythology (These earlier divinities have names that correspond directly to elements of the natural world, like Gaia, Ouranos, Pontos, Nyx, Hemera). By the classical times in Greece, Nyx had less of a cult-following. In this later Greek pantheon Nyx is the personification of the night, and was its goddess. She was revered for Her ocular powers, and Her realm was in a cave in the far West beyond the land of Atlas. She was portrayed as a young woman, dressed in a star-covered gown. On several Greek vases She is shown riding a chariot pulled by four horses. Her attribute is a reversed torch. The Greek Nyx is related to the Egyptian Goddess Nuit, Goddess of the Black Night.

Nyx is associated with the Night; the color black; eggs and birth. Nyx is a good Goddess to call forth when you need to reclaim your awareness of your original essential nature.

 

 

Nyx – Goddess of Night

 


 

NYX, also known as Nux, Nox or simply Night is a primordial Greek goddess who personifies the essence of night and darkness. She is the ancient goddess of Night-hence the meaning of her name. She is considered to be one of the most powerful divine beings who was born of the giant cosmic being, Chaos. Ancients believed that before the universe was created there existed only a void of “chaos” that was black and silent. From this “chaos” Nyx emerged into existence. She is often depicted  as a great black winged spirit or riding in a chariot, trailing stars and bringing the night, accompanied by Her sons Hypnos and Thanatos and even a figure of exceptional power and beauty who was found in the shadows of the world who could only ever be seen in glimpses.

 


 

According to myth, Nyx conceived from the wind and laid a silver egg in the darkness-the upper part of the egg being the sky and the lower section was the earth. She could be helpful or harmful to humankind, bringing either sleep or death. Nyx had many children, but some believed she only had two. Most of her children seem to have represented the ‘darker’ aspects of humanity, such as the Three Fates, Nemesis, Sleep, Death, Doom, Misery, Deceit, and Strife. Nyx was known for her prophetic powers and was mostly affiliated with owls and bats. Her planet is obviously the moon and the best time to connect with her is on a Monday, especially around Yule. Nyx is associated with the Night; the color black; eggs and birth. Nyx is of good help to call forth when you need to reclaim awareness of your original essential nature, for protection, cleansing and fertility.

 


 

Nyx represents nightmares, mystery, dreams, darkness and night. It is recommended to call upon Nyx after sunset.  She can be invoked her for psychic dreams and astral travel and for rituals at midnight or when it is a moonless night. Offerings to this goddess could include libations of water from a natural source such as a river or a lake as well as red wine, honey, or oil.

Her name might sound familiar to you if you have read any of the House of Night books, as Nyx plays a key role as the goddess of vampires in this series that was written by P.C. Cast and her daughter Kristin Cast. Additionally, in 2005 a moon near Pluto was discovered named Nix in honor of the goddess. Some people may also recognize her name because of Nyx Cosmetics, who named the company after this powerful goddess. Nox is also a Fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics Universe, which is based loosely on Nyx of Greek Mythology.

Some of her correspondences include:

Part of the day: Night
Day of Week: Monday
Color: Black, Silver, Grey or White
Candle: White
Incense: Myrtle, Aloes and Camphor
Symbol: The Moon, 3 Stars and a Crescent Moon
Plants: Night-Blooming Flowers
Metals: Silver
Fruits: Dragon Fruit
Foods: Eggs
Perfumes: White Poppy, White Rose and Wallflower
Nyx can be called forth for: Cleansing, Protection, awareness of self, and fertility

Her children were believed to be:

Aether- the god of air
Apate- the goddess of deceit
Dolos- the god of trickery
Eleos- the goddess of mercy
Epiphron- the god of prudence
Eris- the goddess of strife
Eros- the god of procreation
Geras- the god of old age
Hemera- the goddess of daylight
Hybris- the goddess of insolence
Hypnos- the god of sleep
Kharon- the ferryman for the dead
Momos- the god of ridicule
Moros- the god of doom
Nemesis- the goddess of retribution
Oizys- the goddess of misery
Philotes- the goddess of friendship
Sophrusyne- the goddess of moderation
Thanatos- the god of non-violent death
The Hesperides- goddesses of the evening
The Moirai- the fates
The Oneiroi- spirits of dreams
The Erintes- the furies
The Keres- goddesses of violent death

A Prayer for the Goddess Nyx

She walks in beauty

Like the night

Upon darkened hills

under starlit skies

Bless the moon

Full tonight

And enchanted magic

elemental light

in the name of the goddess

the daughter

and the elements

 

Casting Instructions for 'Nyx's Protection Spell'

Put all colored candles except for the purple candle in a box formation. Clockwise: Yellow, Red, Blue, then Green. Place the purple candle in the center. Call each element to the circle in Nyx's name as you light the candles in clockwise order and then to the center.

"Oh mighty air, that rushes its force through the trees and plants on a windy night, I call to thee!"
"Oh mighty fire, that warms us and helps provide us with many comforts, I call to thee!"
"Oh mighty water, that overtakes low land with great force and is essential to all life, I call to thee!"
"Oh mighty earth, that we walk upon and must treat as we would our own kin, I call to thee!"
"Oh mighty spirit, that rages through all of us, keeping us strong and healthy, in the name of Night and my goddess Nyx, I call to thee!"

Lift your head toward the sky (Best during a full moon at the height of Nyx's power) and call this prayer to Nyx.

"Oh sweet Mother of Night, I call upon your name to bring me your protection in my troubles."

State what is bothering you and you may offer ideas for Nyx to help you fix it.

"In Nyx's name I call to thee, make my troubles disappear by three! In moon and pentagram and moon again, Please send your wisdom and protection!"

Blow out the candles counter-clockwise. (Spirit [Purple], Earth [Green], Water [Blue], Fire [Red], Air [Yellow])

Thank each element as you dismiss Nyx's prayer circle.

 

 

 

 

Earth protection spell/circle incense

 

This is an earth protection ritual calling upon the Goddess Nyx.

Need:

Small Green Candle

Rosemary Water

Salt

Rosemary Incense

Cast your Circle, and then Pour Rosemary water into Offering Bowl. Take your athame and put some salt on its tip then mix with the rosemary water. Lift the water with salt in the sky and then chant:

"Rosemary is the earth element of protection, added with salt to add to this protection the Goddess three. I call forth your protection from our home on earth, So Mote it Be"

Light rosemary incense and chant:

" This rosemary incense is my offering to my Great Mother, Nyx, added with the cleansing water. My offering is set."

Light green candle and chant:

"Green is the color of the earth, I call upon your ancient energy to set an earthly shield upon [Name of Place or Person], in this hour on this [Name of Month] night. The Goddess above comes with this prayer, as I will it,So Mote it Be!"

Meditate with the lit green candle for at least five minutes and then bind your ritual with the Goddess three"

"I bind this Ritual in the name of Nyx and Erebus, So Mote it Be!"

Light the candle before you go to sleep each night until it is melted. Then on the night after it is completely melted, bury out side the place you wish to protect, or give to the person to hide under their bed.

Circle incense

4 parts Frankincense

2 parts Myrrh

2 parts Benzoin

For thousands of years, people have used fragrant flowers, plants, and herbs as incense. Using smoke to send prayers out to the gods is one of the oldest known forms of ceremony. From the censers of the Catholic church to the Pagan bonfire rituals incense is a powerful way to let your intent be known. You can make your own quite easily using a blend of herbs, flowers, wood bark, resins and berries. Most of these are items you can grow yourself, find in the woods or purchase inexpensively. Why make your own? You can buy commercially produced incense sticks and cones just about anywhere and they're not that expensive. However, they're made with synthetic ingredients and therefore have little to no magical value. While they're nice to burn and certainly smell lovely, they serve little purpose in a ritual setting.

Nyx is the Goddess of the Night.  Her name has both Greek and African origins, in Greek the name means GODDESS OF THE NIGHT, in African the name means GODDESS OF LIGHT.  Nyx, also known as Nox, was the first daughter of Chaos, gave birth to Erebus (Darkness), Tartarus (a place deep beneath the underworld), and Gaia (Mother Earth) whom is also known as her sister.  She mated with Erebus and bore to him two children, Aether (Upper Air) and Hemera (Day).  Then, on her own she gave birth to Apate (Deception), Eris (Discord), Geras (Old Age), The Hesperides (Hespere, Eretheis and Aegle), Hypnos (Sleep), Kera (Fate), Keres (Misery), Moirai (The Fates: Klotho, Lakhesis and Atropos), Momos (Blame), Moros (End),Nemesis (Divine Retribution), Oizys (Pain), Oneiroi (the Tribe of Dreams), Philotes (Affection) and Thanatos (Death).

Nyx has been attributed with the powers over illness, suffering, dreams, misfortunes, quarrels, war, murder, sleep and death.  In fact, any inexplicable or frightening thing that befell man is attributed to her.  Nyx is also the surpreme ruler of prophetic power.

Nyx by Jessica Galbreth

Nyx lives like her daughter Hermera, beyond the horizons in Tartarus.  Twice every day, at dusk and dawn they pass the bronze gates of the other world, to traverse the heavens.  Nyx rides in a black chariot drawn by two black steeds, and accompanied by the stars.  She is a serious figure clad in long, heavy drapery, on her head a black star spangled veil, she has black wings and carries twin children in her arms.  One child was black, who was Death; the other was white, who was Sleep. 

Nyx covers many theologies and symbolically represents the Darkness within each of us.  She is the eternal lure, the endless possibilities of fathomless resourses.  Nyx is the shadow made divine; for if we only have the courage to understand and embrace the darkness, we find that all things are possible, and nothing is out of reach if we only give it form.  Nyx has no limits.  She also reminds us that it is easy to get caught up in the delusions around our suffering, our misfortunes, and our fears.  Nyx calls us to lift the veils of illusions, to awaken our power and dismantle blame so that wholeness can be attained within each of us.  She is here to let us know that we have more potential than we realize if only we would open ourselves and our hearts to her. 


 


 

                                              

                                                Additional attributes:

Element:  Water

Planet:  Moon

Colors:  Black and Silver

Symbol:  Stars on a black veil

Animals: Bat and Owl

Day of the Week:  Monday

Time of Year:  Strongest around Yule.


 


 


Trance Journey with Nyx:

This journey is most powerful if done outside on a moonless night so that the stars are bright in the sky.  Go to an uninterrupted place, sit quietly and calm your thoughts.  Look at the stars and ask Nyx to be with you, guide you, and bring you back to this world.  As you are gazing on the stars one seems to move closer.  As it does you can see the beautiful pearly white light entering you.  It begins at your head, flowing down filling your heart, hands, and all the way down to your feet.  You see this beautiful light eminating from your feet, your hands, your heart, your head and when you speak, from your mouth.  This star light is cleansing you, taking all your blameful thoughts, words, and actions from you.  These negative things are being replaced by the knowing of all that is possible and by love.  In turn, visualize each person that you have condemned, or who may be condemning you.  If you have harmed another, send some of this pearly white light to them and ask for their forgiveness.  If another has harmed you, send some white light to them and ask that the hurt be replaced by forgiveness.  Know that you are safe and protected by this beautiful starlight and that you are cleansed and ready to start anew.  Thank the star for cleansing you and Nyx for being your guide and release them.  Sit awhile longer and be still.  Think of those whom you asked for forgiveness from and seek them out to apologize to them personally if at all possible.  Carry with you the knowledge that you safe and protected by the beautiful white pearly light of the star.