airwolf

~*~ Elder Airwolf LoP Ministry Founder/Owner~*~

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Merry Meet Legionnaires~
I am sixth generation Native Blackfoot and Scottish Celt. My Grandmother was one of my mentors her being a shaman, and my other mentor was my Druid Celtic Aunt. I was raised pagan and my education started at the age
of seven and formally after my first moon lodge ritual at 12. I am also trained as a voodoo priestess
I have one son now coming into his native shaman training and 4 beautiful grandchildren.

ARADIA CHAPTER II

CHAPTER II
The Sabbat: Treguenda or Witch-Meeting-
How to Consecrate the Supper

Here follows the supper, of what It must consist, and what shall be said and done to consecrate it to Diana.

You shall take meal and salt, honey and water, and make this incantation:

Scongiurazione della Farina.

Scongiuro te, o farina!
Che sei il corpo nostro-senza di te
Non si potrebbe vivere-tu che
Prima di divenire la farina,
Sei stata sotto terra, dove tutti
Sono nascosti tutti in segreti,
Maccinata che siei a metterte al vento,
Tu spolveri per l'aria e te ne fuggi
Portando con te i tuoi segreti!

Ma quando grano sarai in spighe,
In spige belle che le lucciole,
Vengeno a farti lume perche tu
Possa crescere piú bella, altrimenti
Tu non potresti crescere a divenire bella,
Dunque anche tu appartieni
Alle Strege o alle Fate, perche
Le lucclole appartengono
Al Sol...
Lucciola caporala,
Vieni corri e vieni a gara,
Metti la briglia a la cavalla!
Metti la briglia al figluolo del ré!
Vieni, corri e portala a mé!
Il figluol del ré te lasciera andare
Pero voglio te pigliare,
Giache siei bella e lucente,
Ti voglio mettere sotto un bicchiere
E quardari, colla lente;
Sotto un bicchiere in staraí
Fino che tutti i segreti,
Di questo mondo e di quell'altro non mi farai
Sapere e anche quelle del grano,
E della farina appena,
Questi segreti io saprò,
Lucciola mia libera ti lascieró
Quando i segreti della terra io sapró
Tu sia benedetta ti diro!

Scongiarazione del Sale.

Scongiuro il sale suona mezza giòrno,
In punto in mezzo a un fiume,
Entro e qui miro I'acqua.
L'acqua e al sol altro non penso,
Che a I'acqua e al sol, alloro
La mia menta tutta e rivolta,
Altro pensier non ho desidero,
Saper la verissima che tanto tempo é
Che soffro, vorrei saper il mio avenir,
Se cattivo fosse, acqua e sol
Migliorate il destino mio!

The Conjuration of Meal.

I conjure thee, O Meal!
Who art indeed our body, since without thee
We could not live, thou who (at first as seed)
Before becoming flower went in the earth,
Where all deep secrets hide, and then when ground
Didst dance like, dust in the wind, and yet meanwhile
Didst bear with thee in flitting, secrets strange!

And yet erewhile, when thou wert in the ear,
Even as a (golden) glittering grain, even then
The fireflies came to cast on thee their light[1]
And aid thy growth, because without their help
Thou couldst not grow nor beautiful become;
Therefore thou clost belong unto the race
Of witches or fairies, and because
The fireflies do belong unto the sun....

Queen of the Fireflies! hurry apace,[2]
Come to me now as if running a race,
Bridle the horse as you hear me now sing!
Bridle, O bridle the son of the king!
Come in a hurry and bring him to me!
The son of the king will ere long set thee free!

[1. There is an evident association here of the body of the firefly (which much resembles a grain of wheat) with the latter.

2. The six lines following are often heard as a nursery rhyme.]

And because thou for ever art brilliant and fair,
Under a glass I will keep thee; while there,
With a lens I will study thy secrets concealed,
Till all their bright mysteries are fully revealed,
Yea, all the wondrous lore perplexed
Of this life of our cross and of the next.
Thus to all mysteries I shall attain,
Yea, even to that at last of the grain;
And when this at last I shall truly know,
Firefly, freely I'll let thee go!
When Earth's dark secrets are known to me,
My blessing at last I will give to thee!

Here follows the Conjuration of the Salt.

Conjuration of the Salt.

I do conjure thee, salt, lo! here at noon,
Exactly in the middle of a stream
I take my place and see the water round,
Likewise the sun, and think of nothing else
While here besides the water and the sun:
For all my soul is turned in truth to them;
I do indeed desire no other thought,
I yearn to learn the very truth of truths,
For I have suffered long with the desire
To know my future or my coming fate,
If good or evil will prevail in it.
Water and sun, be gracious unto me!

Here follows the Conjuration of Cain.

Scongiurazione di Caïno.

Tuo Caïno, tu non possa aver
Ne pace e ne bene fino che
Dal sole[1] andate non sarai col piedi
Correndo, le mani battendo,
E pregarlo per me che mi faccia sapere,
Il mio destino, se cattiva fosse,
Allora me to faccia cambiare,
Se questa grazia nil farete,
L'acqua al lo splendor del sol la guardero:
E tu Caïno colla tua bocca mi dirai
Il mio destino quale sarà:
Se questa grazia o Caïno non mi farai,
Pace e bene non avrai!

The Conjuration of Cain.

I conjure thee, O Cain, as thou canst ne'er
Have rest or peace until thou shalt be freed
From the sun where thou art prisoned, and must go
Beating thy hands and running fast meanwhile:[2]
I pray thee let me know my destiny;
And if 'tis evil, change its course for me!
If thou wilt grant this grace, I'll see it clear
In the water in the splendour of the sun;
and thou, O Cain, shalt tell by word of mouth
Whatever this my destiny is to be.
And unless thou grantest this,
May'st thou ne'er know peace or bliss!

[1. Probably a mistake for Luna.

2. This implies keeping himself warm, and is proof positive that moon should here be read for sun. According to another legend Cain suffers from cold in the moon]

Then shall follow the Conjuration of Diana.
Scongiurazione a Diana.

You shall make cakes of meal, wine, salt, and honey in the shape of a (crescent or horned) moon, and then put them to bake, and say:

Non cuoco ne il pane ne il sale,
Non cuoco ne il vino ne il miele,
Cuoco il corpo il sangue e l'anima,
L'anima di Diana, che non possa
Avere ne la pace e ne bene,
Possa essere sempre in mezzo alle pene
Fino che la grazia non mi farà,
Che glielo chiesta egliela chiedo di cuore!
Se questa grazia, o Diana, mi farai,
La cena in tua lode in molti la faremo,
Mangiaremo, beveremo,
Balleremo, salteremo,
Se questa grazia che ti ho chiesta,
Se questa grazia tu mi farai,
Nel tempo che balliamo,
Il lume spengnerai,
Cosi al l'amore
Liberamente la faremo!

Conjuration of Diana.

I do not bake the bread, nor with it salt,
Nor do I cook the honey with the wine,
I bake the body and the blood and soul,
The soul of (great) Diana, that she shall
Know neither rest nor peace, and ever be
In cruel suffering till she will grant
What I request, what I do most desire,
I beg it of her from my very heart!
And if the grace be granted, O Diana!
In honour of thee I will hold this feast,
Feast and drain the goblet deep,
We, will dance and wildly leap,
And if thou grant'st the grace which I require,
Then when the dance is wildest, all the lamps
Shall be extinguished and we'll freely love!

And thus shall it be done: all shall sit down to the supper all naked, men and women, and, the feast over, they shall dance, sing, make music, and then love in the darkness, with all the lights extinguished: for it is the Spirit of Diana who extinguishes them, and so they will dance and make music in her praise.

And it came to pass that Diana, after her daughter had accomplished her mission or spent her time on earth among the living (mortals), recalled her, and gave her the power that when she had been invoked... having done some good deed... she gave her the power to gratify those who had conjured her by granting her or him success in love:

To bless or curse with power friends or enemies [to do good or evil].
To converse with spitrits.
To find hidden treasures in ancient ruins.
To conjure the spirits of priests who died leaving treasures.
To understand the voice of the wind.
To change water into wine.
To divine with cards.
To know the secrets of the hand (palmistry).
To cure diseases.
To make those who are ugly beautiful.
To tame wild beasts.

Whatever thing should be asked from the spirit of Aradia, that should be granted unto those who merited her favour.

And thus must they invoke her:

Thus do I seek Aradia! Aradia! Aradia![1] At mid night, at midnight I go into a field, and with me I bear water, wine, and salt, I bear water, wine, and salt, and my talisman-my talisman, my talisman, and a red small bag which I ever hold in my hand con dentro, con dentro, sale, with salt in it, in it. With the water and wine I bless myself, I bless myself with devotion to implore a favour from Aradia, Aradia.

Sconjurazione di Aradia.

Aradia, Aradia mia!
Tu che siei figlia del più peggiore
Che si trova nell Inferno,
Che dal Paradiso fu discacciata,

[1. This is a formula which is to be slowly recited, emphasising the repetitions.]

E con una sorella, te ha creata,
Ma tua madre pentita del suo fallo,
A voluto di fare di te uno spirito,
Un spirito benigno,
E non maligno!

Aradia! Aradia! Tanto ti prego
Per I'amore che por ti ha tua madre,
E a I'amor tuo che tanto l'ami,
Ti prego di farmi la grazia,
La grazia che lo ti chiedo
Se questa grazia mi farei,
Tre cose mi farai vedere,
    Serpe strisciare,
    Lucciola volare,
    E rana cantare
Se questa grazia non mi farai,
Desidero tu non possa avere,
Avere più pace e ne bene,
E che da lontano tu debba scomodarti.
E a me raccomodarti,
Che ti obri... che tu possa tornar
Presto al tuo destino.

The Invocation to Aradia.

Aradia! my Aradia!
Thou who art daughter unto him who was
Most evil of all spirits, who of old
Once reigned in hell when driven away from heaven,
Who by his sister did thy sire become,
But as thy mother did repent her fault,
And wished to mate thee to a spirit who
Should be benevolent,
And not malevolent!

Aradia, Aradia! I implore
Thee by the love which she did bear for thee!
And by the love which I too feel for thee!
I pray thee grant the grace which I require!
And if this grace be granted, may there be
One of three signs distinctly clear to me:
    The hiss of a serpent,
    The light of a firefly,
    The sound of a frog!
But if you do refuse this favour, then
May you in future know no peace not- joy,
And be obliged to seek me from afar,
Until you come to grant me my desire,
In haste, and then thou may'st return again
Unto thy destiny. Therewith, Amen!

ARADIA CHAPTER III & IV

CHAPTER III
How Diana Made the Stars and the Rain

Diana was the first created before all creation; in her were all things; out of herself, the first darkness, she divided herself; into darkness and light she was divided. Lucifer, her brother and son, herself and her other half, was the light.

And when Diana saw that the light was so beautiful, the light which was her other half, her brother Lucifer, she yearned for it with exceeding great desire. Wishing to receive the light again into her darkness, to swallow it up in rapture, in delight, she trembled with desire. This desire was the Dawn.

But Lucifer, the light, fled from her, and would not yield to her wishes; he was the light which files into the most distant parts of heaven, the mouse which files before the cat.

Then Diana went to the fathers of the Beginning, to the mothers, the spirits who were before the first spirit, and lamented unto them that she could not prevail with Lucifer. And they praised her for her courage, they told her that to rise she must fall; to become the chief of goddesses she must become a mortal.

And in the ages, in the course of time, when the world was made, Diana went on earth, as did Lucifer, who had fallen, and Diana taught magic and sorcery, whence came witches and fairies and goblins-all that is like man, yet not mortal.

And it came thus that Diana took the form of a cat. Her brother had a cat whom he loved beyond all creatures, and it slept every night on his bed, a cat beautiful beyond all other creatures, a fairy: he did not know it.

Diana prevailed with the cat to change forms with her, so she lay with her brother, and in the darkness assumed her own form, and so by Lucifer became the mother of Aradia. But when in the morning he found that he lay by his sister, and that light had been conquered by darkness, Lucifer was extremely angry; but Diana sang to him a spell, a song of power, and he was silent, the song of the night which soothes to sleep; he could say nothing. So Diana with her wiles of witchcraft so charmed him that he yielded to her love. This was the first fascination, she hummed the song, it was as the buzzing of bees (or a top spinning round), a spinning-wheel spinning life. She spun the lives of all men; all things were spun from the wheel of Diana. Lucifer turned the wheel.

Diana was not known to the witches and spirits, the fairies and elves who dwell in desert place, the goblins, as their mother; she hid herself in humility and was a mortal, but by her will she rose again above all. She had such passion for witchcraft, and became so powerful therein, that her greatness could not be hidden.

And thus it came to pass one night, at the meeting of all the sorceresses and fairies, she declared that she would darken the heavens and turn all the stars into mice.

All those who were present said-

"If thou canst do such a strange thing, having risen to such power, thou shalt be our queen."

Diana went into the street; she took the bladder of an ox and a piece of witch-money, which has an edge like a knife-with such money witches cut the earth from men's foot-tracks-and she cut the earth, and with it and many mice she filled the bladder, and blew into the bladder till it burst.

And there came a great marvel, for the earth which was in the bladder became the round heaven above, and for three days there was a great rain; the mice became stars or rain. And having made the heaven and the stars and the rain, Diana became Queen of the Witches; she was the cat who ruled the star-mice, the heaven and the rain.

CHAPTER IV
The Charm of the Stones Consecrated to Diana

To find a stone with a hole in it is a special sign of the favour of Diana. He who does so shall take it in his hand and repeat the following, having observed the ceremony as enjoined:-

Scongiurazione della pietra bucata.

Una pietra bucata
L'ho trovato;
Ne ringrazio il destin,
E lo spirito che su questa via
Mi ha portata,
Che passa essere il mio bene,
E la mia buona fortuna!

Mi alzo la mattina al alba,
E a passegio me ne vo
Nelle valli, monti e campi,
La fortuna cercarvo
Della ruta e la verbena,
Quello so porta fortuna
Me lo tengo in senno chiuso
E saperlo nessuno no le deve,
E cosi cio che commendo,
La verbena far ben per me!
Benedica quella strege!
Quella fàta che mi segna!"

Diana fu quella
Che mi venne la notte in sogno
E nu disse: "Se tu voir tener,
Le cattive persone da te lontano,
Devi tenere sempre ruta con te,
Sempre ruta con te e verbena!"

Diana, tu che siei la regina
Del cielo e della terra e dell'inferno,
E siei la prottetrice degli infelici,
Dei ladri, degli assassini, e anche
Di donne di mali affari se hai conosciuto,
Che non sia stato l'indole cattivo
Delle persone, tu Diana,
Diana il hai fatti tutti felici!

Una altra volta ti scongiuro
Che tu non abbia ne pace ne bene,
Tu possa essere sempre in mezzo alle pene,
Fino che la grazia che to ti chiedo
Non mi farai!

Invocation to the Holy-Stone.[1]

I have found
A holy-stone upon the ground.
O Fate! I thank thee for the happy find,
Also the spirit who upon this road
Hath given it to me;
And may it prove to be for my true good
And my good fortune!

I rise in the morning by the earliest dawn,
And I go forth to walk through (pleasant) vales,
All in the mountains or the meadows fair,
Seeking for luck while onward still I roam,
Seeking for rue and vervain scented sweet,
Because they bring good fortune unto all.
I keep them safely guarded in my bosom,
That none may know it-'tis a secret thing,
And sacred too, and thus I speak the spell:
"O vervain! ever be a benefit,
And may thy blessing be upon the witch
Or on the fairy who did give thee to me!"

It was Diana who did come to me,
All in the night in a dream, and said to me:
"If thou would'st keep all evil folk afar,
Then ever keep the vervain and the rue
Safely beside thee!"

[1. Properly, the stone with a hole in it. But such a stone is called holy on shipboard, and here it has really a claim to the name.]

Great Diana! thou
Who art the queen of heaven and of earth,
And of the infernal lands-yea, thou who art
Protectress of all men unfortunate,
Of thieves and murderers, and of women too
Who lead an evil life, and yet hast known
That their nature was not evil, thou, Diana,
Hast still conferred on them some joy in life.[1]

Or I may truly at another time
So conjure thee that thou shalt have no peace
Or happiness, for thou shalt ever be
In suffering until thou grantest that
Which I require in strictest faith from thee!

[Here we have again the threatening the deity, just as in Eskimo or other Shamanism, which represents the rudest primitive form of conjuring, the spirits are menaced. A trace of this is to be found among rude Roman Catholics. Thus when St. Bruno, some years ago, at a town in the Romagna, did not listen to the prayers of his devotees for rain, they stuck his image in the mud of the river, head downwards. A rain speedily followed, and the saint was restored in honour to his place in the church.]

[1. This is an obscure passage, but I believe that I have given it as the poet ineant or felt it.]

The Spell or Conjuration of the Round Stone.[1]

The finding a round stone, be it great or small, is a good sign (e buono augurio), but it should never be given away, because the receiver will then get the good luck, and some disaster befall the giver.

On finding a round stone, raise the eyes to heaven, and throw the stone up three times (catching it every time), and say:-

Spirito del buono augurio!
Sei venuto in mio soccorso,
Credi ne avevo gran bisogno,
Spirito del folletino rosso
Giacche sei venuto in mio soccorso,
Ti prego di non mi abbandonare!
Ti prego dentro questa palla d'intrare,
E nella mia tasca tu possa portare,
Cosi in qualunque mia bisogna,
In mio aiuto ti posso chiamare,
E di giorno e di notte,
Tu non mi possa abbandonare.

Se danari da qualchuno avanzerò
E non mi vorra pagare,
Tu folletino rosso me il farei dare!
Si questo di non darmeli,
Si in testera tu vi anderai
E col tua Brié- brié!

[1.Il sasso a palla.]

Se dorme to desterai,
Panni dal letto laceraì,
Le farai tanta paura
Che allora di andare a dormire,
Andra alle bische a giuocare,
E tu nunqua lu seguirai.

E tu col tuo Brié-brié, le dirai,
Chi non paga delliti
Avranno pene e guai.

Cosi il debitare il giorno appresso,
O mi portera i danari,
O mi il mandera;
E cosi, folletino rosso!
Mi farai felice in mia vita,
Perche in qualcunque mia bisogna,
Verai in mio soccorso!

Se colla mia amante saro' adirato,
Tu spirito del buon augurio mio!
Andrai la notte da lei
Per i capelli la prenderai,
E nel letto mio la porterai;
E la mattina quando tutti gli spiriti
Vanno a riposare,
Tu prima di si' entrare
Nella tua palla si porterai
La mia bella nel suo letto,
Cosi te prego folletino,
Di entrare in questa mia palla!
E di ubbidire a tutti miei commandi!
Ed io ti porteró
Sempre nella tasca mia,
Che tu non mi vada via.

The Conjuration.

Spirit of good omen,
Who art come to aid me,
Believe I had great need of thee.
Spirit of the Red Goblin,
Since thou hast come to aid me in my need,
I pray of thee do not abandon me:
I beg of thee to enter now this stone,
That in my pocket I may carry thee,
And so when anything Is needed by me,
I can call unto thee: be what it may,
Do not abandon me by night or day.

Should I lend money unto any man
Who will not pay when due, I pray of thee,
Thou the Red Goblin, make him pay his debt!
And if he will not and is obstinate,
Go at him with thy cry of "Brié- brié!"
And if he sleeps, awake him with a twitch,
And pull the covering off and frighten him!
And follow him about where'er he goes.

So teach him with thy ceaseless "Brié- brié!"
That he who obligation e'er forgets
Shall be in trouble till he pays his debts.
And so my debtor on the following day
Shall either bring the money which he owes,
Or send it promptly: so I pray of thee,
O my Red Goblin, come unto my aid!
Or should I quarrel with her whom I love,
Then, spirit of good luck, I pray thee go
To her while sleeping-pull her by the hair,
And bear her through the night unto my bed!
And in the morning, when all spirits go
To their repose, do thou, ere thou return'st
Into thy stone, carry her home again,
And leave her there asleep. Therefore, O Sprite!
I beg thee in this pebble make thy home!
Obey in every way all I command.
So in my pocket thou shalt ever be,
And thou and I will ne'er part company!

ARADIA CHAPTER II

CHAPTER II
The Sabbat: Treguenda or Witch-Meeting-
How to Consecrate the Supper

Here follows the supper, of what It must consist, and what shall be said and done to consecrate it to Diana.

You shall take meal and salt, honey and water, and make this incantation:

Scongiurazione della Farina.

Scongiuro te, o farina!
Che sei il corpo nostro-senza di te
Non si potrebbe vivere-tu che
Prima di divenire la farina,
Sei stata sotto terra, dove tutti
Sono nascosti tutti in segreti,
Maccinata che siei a metterte al vento,
Tu spolveri per l'aria e te ne fuggi
Portando con te i tuoi segreti!

Ma quando grano sarai in spighe,
In spige belle che le lucciole,
Vengeno a farti lume perche tu
Possa crescere piú bella, altrimenti
Tu non potresti crescere a divenire bella,
Dunque anche tu appartieni
Alle Strege o alle Fate, perche
Le lucclole appartengono
Al Sol...
Lucciola caporala,
Vieni corri e vieni a gara,
Metti la briglia a la cavalla!
Metti la briglia al figluolo del ré!
Vieni, corri e portala a mé!
Il figluol del ré te lasciera andare
Pero voglio te pigliare,
Giache siei bella e lucente,
Ti voglio mettere sotto un bicchiere
E quardari, colla lente;
Sotto un bicchiere in staraí
Fino che tutti i segreti,
Di questo mondo e di quell'altro non mi farai
Sapere e anche quelle del grano,
E della farina appena,
Questi segreti io saprò,
Lucciola mia libera ti lascieró
Quando i segreti della terra io sapró
Tu sia benedetta ti diro!

Scongiarazione del Sale.

Scongiuro il sale suona mezza giòrno,
In punto in mezzo a un fiume,
Entro e qui miro I'acqua.
L'acqua e al sol altro non penso,
Che a I'acqua e al sol, alloro
La mia menta tutta e rivolta,
Altro pensier non ho desidero,
Saper la verissima che tanto tempo é
Che soffro, vorrei saper il mio avenir,
Se cattivo fosse, acqua e sol
Migliorate il destino mio!

The Conjuration of Meal.

I conjure thee, O Meal!
Who art indeed our body, since without thee
We could not live, thou who (at first as seed)
Before becoming flower went in the earth,
Where all deep secrets hide, and then when ground
Didst dance like, dust in the wind, and yet meanwhile
Didst bear with thee in flitting, secrets strange!

And yet erewhile, when thou wert in the ear,
Even as a (golden) glittering grain, even then
The fireflies came to cast on thee their light[1]
And aid thy growth, because without their help
Thou couldst not grow nor beautiful become;
Therefore thou clost belong unto the race
Of witches or fairies, and because
The fireflies do belong unto the sun....

Queen of the Fireflies! hurry apace,[2]
Come to me now as if running a race,
Bridle the horse as you hear me now sing!
Bridle, O bridle the son of the king!
Come in a hurry and bring him to me!
The son of the king will ere long set thee free!

[1. There is an evident association here of the body of the firefly (which much resembles a grain of wheat) with the latter.

2. The six lines following are often heard as a nursery rhyme.]

And because thou for ever art brilliant and fair,
Under a glass I will keep thee; while there,
With a lens I will study thy secrets concealed,
Till all their bright mysteries are fully revealed,
Yea, all the wondrous lore perplexed
Of this life of our cross and of the next.
Thus to all mysteries I shall attain,
Yea, even to that at last of the grain;
And when this at last I shall truly know,
Firefly, freely I'll let thee go!
When Earth's dark secrets are known to me,
My blessing at last I will give to thee!

Here follows the Conjuration of the Salt.

Conjuration of the Salt.

I do conjure thee, salt, lo! here at noon,
Exactly in the middle of a stream
I take my place and see the water round,
Likewise the sun, and think of nothing else
While here besides the water and the sun:
For all my soul is turned in truth to them;
I do indeed desire no other thought,
I yearn to learn the very truth of truths,
For I have suffered long with the desire
To know my future or my coming fate,
If good or evil will prevail in it.
Water and sun, be gracious unto me!

Here follows the Conjuration of Cain.

Scongiurazione di Caïno.

Tuo Caïno, tu non possa aver
Ne pace e ne bene fino che
Dal sole[1] andate non sarai col piedi
Correndo, le mani battendo,
E pregarlo per me che mi faccia sapere,
Il mio destino, se cattiva fosse,
Allora me to faccia cambiare,
Se questa grazia nil farete,
L'acqua al lo splendor del sol la guardero:
E tu Caïno colla tua bocca mi dirai
Il mio destino quale sarà:
Se questa grazia o Caïno non mi farai,
Pace e bene non avrai!

The Conjuration of Cain.

I conjure thee, O Cain, as thou canst ne'er
Have rest or peace until thou shalt be freed
From the sun where thou art prisoned, and must go
Beating thy hands and running fast meanwhile:[2]
I pray thee let me know my destiny;
And if 'tis evil, change its course for me!
If thou wilt grant this grace, I'll see it clear
In the water in the splendour of the sun;
and thou, O Cain, shalt tell by word of mouth
Whatever this my destiny is to be.
And unless thou grantest this,
May'st thou ne'er know peace or bliss!

[1. Probably a mistake for Luna.

2. This implies keeping himself warm, and is proof positive that moon should here be read for sun. According to another legend Cain suffers from cold in the moon]

Then shall follow the Conjuration of Diana.
Scongiurazione a Diana.

You shall make cakes of meal, wine, salt, and honey in the shape of a (crescent or horned) moon, and then put them to bake, and say:

Non cuoco ne il pane ne il sale,
Non cuoco ne il vino ne il miele,
Cuoco il corpo il sangue e l'anima,
L'anima di Diana, che non possa
Avere ne la pace e ne bene,
Possa essere sempre in mezzo alle pene
Fino che la grazia non mi farà,
Che glielo chiesta egliela chiedo di cuore!
Se questa grazia, o Diana, mi farai,
La cena in tua lode in molti la faremo,
Mangiaremo, beveremo,
Balleremo, salteremo,
Se questa grazia che ti ho chiesta,
Se questa grazia tu mi farai,
Nel tempo che balliamo,
Il lume spengnerai,
Cosi al l'amore
Liberamente la faremo!

Conjuration of Diana.

I do not bake the bread, nor with it salt,
Nor do I cook the honey with the wine,
I bake the body and the blood and soul,
The soul of (great) Diana, that she shall
Know neither rest nor peace, and ever be
In cruel suffering till she will grant
What I request, what I do most desire,
I beg it of her from my very heart!
And if the grace be granted, O Diana!
In honour of thee I will hold this feast,
Feast and drain the goblet deep,
We, will dance and wildly leap,
And if thou grant'st the grace which I require,
Then when the dance is wildest, all the lamps
Shall be extinguished and we'll freely love!

And thus shall it be done: all shall sit down to the supper all naked, men and women, and, the feast over, they shall dance, sing, make music, and then love in the darkness, with all the lights extinguished: for it is the Spirit of Diana who extinguishes them, and so they will dance and make music in her praise.

And it came to pass that Diana, after her daughter had accomplished her mission or spent her time on earth among the living (mortals), recalled her, and gave her the power that when she had been invoked... having done some good deed... she gave her the power to gratify those who had conjured her by granting her or him success in love:

To bless or curse with power friends or enemies [to do good or evil].
To converse with spitrits.
To find hidden treasures in ancient ruins.
To conjure the spirits of priests who died leaving treasures.
To understand the voice of the wind.
To change water into wine.
To divine with cards.
To know the secrets of the hand (palmistry).
To cure diseases.
To make those who are ugly beautiful.
To tame wild beasts.

Whatever thing should be asked from the spirit of Aradia, that should be granted unto those who merited her favour.

And thus must they invoke her:

Thus do I seek Aradia! Aradia! Aradia![1] At mid night, at midnight I go into a field, and with me I bear water, wine, and salt, I bear water, wine, and salt, and my talisman-my talisman, my talisman, and a red small bag which I ever hold in my hand con dentro, con dentro, sale, with salt in it, in it. With the water and wine I bless myself, I bless myself with devotion to implore a favour from Aradia, Aradia.

Sconjurazione di Aradia.

Aradia, Aradia mia!
Tu che siei figlia del più peggiore
Che si trova nell Inferno,
Che dal Paradiso fu discacciata,

[1. This is a formula which is to be slowly recited, emphasising the repetitions.]

E con una sorella, te ha creata,
Ma tua madre pentita del suo fallo,
A voluto di fare di te uno spirito,
Un spirito benigno,
E non maligno!

Aradia! Aradia! Tanto ti prego
Per I'amore che por ti ha tua madre,
E a I'amor tuo che tanto l'ami,
Ti prego di farmi la grazia,
La grazia che lo ti chiedo
Se questa grazia mi farei,
Tre cose mi farai vedere,
    Serpe strisciare,
    Lucciola volare,
    E rana cantare
Se questa grazia non mi farai,
Desidero tu non possa avere,
Avere più pace e ne bene,
E che da lontano tu debba scomodarti.
E a me raccomodarti,
Che ti obri... che tu possa tornar
Presto al tuo destino.

The Invocation to Aradia.

Aradia! my Aradia!
Thou who art daughter unto him who was
Most evil of all spirits, who of old
Once reigned in hell when driven away from heaven,
Who by his sister did thy sire become,
But as thy mother did repent her fault,
And wished to mate thee to a spirit who
Should be benevolent,
And not malevolent!

Aradia, Aradia! I implore
Thee by the love which she did bear for thee!
And by the love which I too feel for thee!
I pray thee grant the grace which I require!
And if this grace be granted, may there be
One of three signs distinctly clear to me:
    The hiss of a serpent,
    The light of a firefly,
    The sound of a frog!
But if you do refuse this favour, then
May you in future know no peace not- joy,
And be obliged to seek me from afar,
Until you come to grant me my desire,
In haste, and then thou may'st return again
Unto thy destiny. Therewith, Amen!

ARADIA: The Gospel of the Witches

by Charles G. Leland (pub. 1899)

PREFACE

If the reader has ever met with the works of the learned folk-lorist G. Pitré, or the articles contributed by "Lady Vere De Vere" to the Italian Rivista, or that of J. H. Andrews to Folk-Lore,[1] he will be aware that there are in Italy great numbers of strege, fortune-tellers or witches, who divine by cards, perform strange ceremonies in which spirits are supposed to be invoked, make and sell amulets, and, in fact, comport themselves generally as their reputed kind are wont to do, be they Black Voodoos in America or sorceresses anywhere.

But the Italian strega or sorceress is in certain respects a different character from these. In most cases she comes of a family in which her calling or art has been practised for many gen erations. I have no doubt that there are in stances in which the ancestry remounts to mediæval, Roman, or it may be Etruscan times. The result has naturally been the accumulation in such families of much tradition. But in North ern Italy, as its literature indicates, though there

[1. March, 1897: "Neapolitan Witchcraft."]

has been some slight gathering of fairy tales and popular superstitions by scholars, there has never existed the least interest as regarded the strange lore of the witches, nor any suspicion that it embraced an incredible quantity of old Roman minor myths and legends, such as Ovid has recorded, but of which much escaped him and all other Latin writers.[1]

This ignorance was greatly aided by the wizards themselves, in making a profound secret of all their traditions, urged thereto by fear of the priests. In fact, the latter all unconsciously actually contributed immensely to the preservation of such lore, since the charm of the forbidden is very great, and witchcraft, like the truffle, grows best and has its raciest flavour when most deeply hidden. However this may be, both priest and wizard are vanishing now with incredible rapidity-it has even struck a French writer that a Franciscan in a railway carriage is a strange anomaly-and a few more years of newspapers and bicycles (Heaven knows what it

[1. Thus we may imagine what the case would have been as regards German fairy-tales if nothing bad survived to a future day except the collections of Grimm and Musæus. The world would fall into the belief that these constituted all the works of the kind which had ever existed, when, in fact they form only a small part of the whole. And folklore was unknown to classic authors: there is really no evidence in any ancient Latin writer that he gathered traditions and the like among the vulgar, as men collect at present. They all made books entirely out of books-there being still "a few left of the same sort" of literati.]

will be when flying-machines appear!) will probably cause an evanishment of all.

However, they die slowly, and even yet there are old people in the Romagna of the North who know the Etruscan names of the Twelve Gods, and invocations to Bacchus, Jupiter, and Venus, Mercury, and the Lares or ancestral spirits, and in the cities are women who prepare strange amulets, over which they mutter spells, all known in the old Roman time, and who can astonish even the learned by their legends of Latin gods, mingled with lore which may be found in Cato or Theocritus. With one of these I became intimately acquainted in 1886, and have ever since employed her specially to collect among her sisters of the hidden spell in many places all the traditions of the olden time known to them. It is true that I have drawn from other sources, but this woman by long practice has perfectly learned what few understand, or just what I want, and how to extract it from those of her kind.

Among other strange relics, she succeeded, after many years, in obtaining the following "Gospel," which I have in her handwriting. A full account of its nature with many details will be found in an Appendix. I do not know definitely whether my informant derived a part of these traditions from written sources or oral narration, but believe it was chiefly the latter. However, there are a few wizards who copy or preserve documents relative to their art. I have not seen my collector since the "Gospel" was sent to me. I hope at some future time to be better informed.

For brief explanation I may say that witch craft is known to its votaries as la vecchia religione, or the old religion, of which Diana is the Goddess, her daughter Aradia (or Herodias) the female Messiah, and that this little work sets forth how the latter was born, came down to earth, established witches and witchcraft, and then returned to heaven. With it are given the ceremonies and invocations or incantations to be addressed to Diana and Aradia, the exorcism of Cain, and the spells of the holy-stone, rue, and verbena, constituting, as the text declares, the regular church-service, so to speak, which is to be chanted or pronounced at the witch-meetings. There are also included the very curious incantations or benedictions of the honey, meal, and salt, or cakes of the witch-supper, which is curiously classical, and evidently a relic of the Roman Mysteries.

The work could have been extended ad infinitum by adding to it the ceremonies and incantations which actually form a part of the Scripture of Witchcraft, but as these are nearly all-or at least in great number-to be found in my works entitled Etruscan-Roman Remains and Legends of Florence, I have hesitated to compile such a volume before ascertaining whether there is a sufficiently large number of the public who would buy such a work.

Since writing the foregoing I have met with and read a very clever and entertaining work entitled Il Romanzo dei Settimani, G. Cavagnari, 1889, in which the author, in the form of a novel, vividly depicts the manners, habits of thought, and especially the nature of witchcraft, and the many superstitions current among the peasants in Lombardy. Unfortunately, notwithstanding his extensive knowledge of the subject, it never seems to have once occurred to the narrator that these traditions were anything but noxious nonsense or abominably un-Christian folly. That there exists in them marvellous relics of ancient mythology and valuable folklore, which is the very cor cordium of history, is as uncared for by him as it would be by a common Zoccolone or tramping Franciscan. One would think it might have been suspected by a man who knew that a witch really endeavoured to kill seven people as a ceremony or rite, in order to get the secret of endless wealth, that such a sorceress must have had a store of wondrous legends; but of all this there is no trace, and it is very evident that nothing could be further from his mind than that there was anything interesting from a higher or more genial point of view in it all.

His book, in fine, belongs to the very great number of those written on ghosts and superstition since the latter has fallen into discredit, in which the authors indulge in much satirical and very safe but cheap ridicule of what to them is merely vulgar and false. Like Sir Charles Coldstream, they have peeped into the crater of Vesuvius after it had ceased to "erupt," and found "nothing in it." But there was something in it once; and the man of science, which Sir Charles was not, still finds a great deal in the remains, and the antiquarian a Pompeii or a Herculaneum-'tis said there are still seven buried cities to unearth. I have done what little (it is really very little) I could, to disinter something from the dead volcano of Italian sorcery.

If this be the manner in which Italian witchcraft is treated by the most intelligent writer who has depicted it, it will not be deemed remarkable that there are few indeed who will care whether there is a veritable Gospel of Witches, apparently of extreme antiquity, em bodying the belief in a strange counter- religion which has held its own from pre-historic time to the present day. "Witchcraft is all rubbish, or something worse," said old writers, "and therefore all books about it are nothing better." I sincerely trust, however, that these pages may fall into the hands of at least a few who will think better of them.

I should, however, in justice to those who do care to explore dark and bewildering paths, explain clearly that witch-lore is hidden with most scrupulous care from all save a very few in Italy, just as it is among the Chippeway Medas or the Black Voodoo. In the novel to the life of I Settimani an aspirant is represented as living with a witch and acquiring or picking up with pain, scrap by scrap, her spells and incantations, giving years to it. So my friend the late M. Dragomanoff told me how a certain man in Hungary, having learned that he had collected many spells (which were indeed subsequently published in folklore journals), stole into the scholar's room and surreptitiously copied them, so that the next year when Dragomanoff returned, he found the thief in full practice as a blooming magician. Truly he had not got many incantations, only a dozen or so, but a very little will go a great way in the business, and I venture to say there is perhaps hardly a single witch in Italy who knows as many as I have published, mine having been assiduously collected from many, far and wide. Everything of the kind which is written is, moreover, often destroyed with scrupulous care by priests or penitents, or the vast number who have a superstitious fear of even being in the same house with such documents, so that I regard the rescue of the Vangelo as something which is to say the least remarkable.

CONTENTS

PREFACE

CHAPTER I
How Diana Gave Birth to Aradia (Herodias)

Of the sufferings of Mankind, and how Diana sent Aradia on earth to relieve them by teaching resistance and Sorcery-Poem addressed to Mankind-How to invoke Diana or Aradia.

CHAPTER II
The Sabbat-Treguenda or Witch-Meeting

How to consecrate the supper- Conjuration of the meal and of Salt-Invocation to Cain- Conjuration of Diana and to Aradia.

CHAPTER III
How Diana Made the Stars and the Rain

CHAPTER IV
Thn, Charm of the Stones Consecrated to Diana-The Incantation of Perforated Stones-The Spell
or Conjuration of the Round Stone

CHAPTER V
The Conjuration of the Lemon and Pins-Incantation to Diana

CHAPTER VI
A Spell to Win Love

CHAPTER VII
To Find or Buy Anything, or to Have Good Fortune Thereby

CHAPTER VIII
How Have a Good Vintage and Very Good Wine By the Aid of Diana

CHAPTER IX
Tana and Endamone, or Diana and Endymion

CHAPTER X
Madonna Diana

A Legend of Cettardo, and how Diana appeared with ten Bridesmaids to give away a Bride- Incantation to Diana for a Wedding.

CHAPTER XI
The House of the Wind
Showing how Diana rescued a Lady from Death at the House ol the Wind in Volterra.

CHAPTER XII
Tana or Diana, The Moon-Goddess

CHAPTER XIII
Diana and the Children

CHAPTER XIV
The Goblin Messengers of Diana and Mercury

CHAPTER XV
Laverna

APPENDIX

ARADIA
OR THE
GOSPEL OF THE WITCHES
CHAPTER I
How Diana Gave Birth to Aradia (Herodias)

"It is Diana! Lo!
She rises crescented."
                              -Keats' Endymion

"Make more bright
The Star Queen's crescent on her marriage night."
                -Ibid.

This is the Gospel (Vangelo) of the Witches:

Diana greatly loved her brother Lucifer, the god of the Sun and of the Moon, the god of Light (Splendor), who was so proud of his beauty, and who for his pride was driven from Paradise.

Diana had by, her brother a daughter, to whom they gave the name of Aradia [i.e. Herodias].

In those days there were on earth many rich and many poor.

The rich made slaves of all the poor.

In those days were many slaves who were cruelly treated; in every palace tortures, in every castle prisoners.

Many slaves escaped. They fled to the country; thus they became thieves and evil folk. Instead of sleeping by night, they plotted escape and robbed their masters, and then slew them. So they dwelt in the mountains and forests as robbers and assassins, all to avoid slavery.

Diana said one day to her daughter Aradia:

E vero che tu set uno spinto,
Ma tu set nata per essere ancora.
Mortale, e tu devi andare
Sulla terra e fare da maestra
A donne e a' uormni che avranno
Volentà di inparare la tua scuola
Che sara cornposta di stregonerle.

Non devi essere come la figlia di Camo,
E della razza che sono devenuti
Scellerati infami a causa del maltrattamenti,
Come Giudel e Zingari,
Tutti ladri e briganti,
Tu non divieni...

Tu sarai (sempre) la prima strega,
La prima strega divenuta nel mondo,
Tu insegnerai l'arte di avvelenare,
Di avvelenare (tutti) I signori,
Di farli morti nei loro palazzi,
Di legare il spiritu del oppressore,
E dove si trova un contadino ricco e avaro,
Insegnare alle strege tue alunne,
Come rovinare suo raccolto
Con tempesta, folgore e balen,
Con grandine e vento.

Quando un prete ti fara del male,
Del male colle sue bene di'Zion,
Tu le farei (sempre) un dopplo male
Col mio nome, col nome di Diana,
Regina delle streghe...

Quando i nobili e prete vi diranno
Dovete credere nel Padre, Figlio,
E Maria, rispondete gli sempre,
"IL vostro dio Padre e Maria
Sono tre diavoli...

Il vero dio Padre non e il vostro
Il vostro dio-io sono venuta
Per distruggere la gente cattiva
E la distruggero....

"Vol altri poveri soffrite anche la fame,
E lavorato malo e molte volte;
Soffrite anche la prigione;
Mapero avete una anima,
Una aninia più buona, e nell'altra,
Nell'altra mondo voi starete bene,
E gli altri male."...

Translation.

'Tis true indeed that thou a spirit art,
But thou wert born but to become again
A mortal; thou must go to earth below
To be a teacher unto women and men
Who fain would study witchcraft in thy school

Yet like Cain's daughter thou shalt never be,
Nor like the race who have become at last
Wicked and infamous from suffering,
As are the Jews and wandering Zingari,
Who are all thieves and knaves; like unto them
Ye shall not be....

And thou shalt be the first of witches known;
And thou shalt be the first of all i' the world;
And thou shalt teach the art of poisoning,
Of poisoning those who are great lords of all;
Yea, thou shalt make them die in their palaces;
And thou shalt bind the oppressor's soul (with power);[1]
And when ye find a peasant who is rich,
Then ye shall teach the witch, your pupil, how
To ruin all his crops with tempests dire,
With lightning and with thunder (terrible),
And the hall and wind....

[1. Legare, the binding and paralysing human faculties by means of witchcraft.]

And when a priest shall do you injury
By his benedictions, ye shall do to him
Double the harm, and do it in the name
Of me, Diana, Queen of witches all!

And when the priests or the nobility
Shall say to you that you should put your faith
In the Father, Son, and Mary, then reply:
"Your God, the Father, and Maria are
Three devils....

"For the true God the Father is not yours;
For I have come to sweep away the bad,
The men of evil, all will I destroy!

"Ye who are poor suffer with hunger keen,
And toll in wretchedness, and suffer too
Full oft imprisonment; yet with it all
Ye have a soul, and for your sufferings
Ye shall be happy in the other world,
But ill the fate of all who do ye wrong!"

Now when Aradia had been taught, taught to work all witchcraft, how to destroy the evil race (of oppressors) she (imparted it to her pupils) and said unto them:

Quando io saro partita da questo mondo,
Qualunque cosa che avrete bisogna,
Una volta al mese quando la luna
E piena...
Dovete venire in luogo deserto,
In una selva tutte insieme,
E adorare lo spirito potente
Di mia madre Diana, e chi vorra
Imparare la stregonerie,
Che non la sopra,
Mia madre le insegnera,
Tutte cose....
Sarete liberi della schiavitù!
E cosi diverrete tutti liberi!
Pero uonum e donne
Sarete tutti nudi, per fino.
Che non sara morto l'ultimo
Degli oppressori e morto,
Farete il gluoco della moccola
Di Benevento, e farete poi
Una cena cosi:

Translation.

When I shall have departed from this world,
Whenever ye have need of anything,
Once in the month, and when the moon is full,
Ye shall assemble in some desert place,
Or in a forest all together join
To adore the potent spirit of your queen,
My mother, great Diana. She who fain
Would learn all sorcery yet has not won
Its deepest secrets, them my mother will
Teach her, in truth all things as yet unknown.
And ye shall all be freed from slavery,
And so ye shall be free in everything;
And as the sign that ye are truly free,
Ye shall be naked in your rites, both men
And women also: this shall last until
The last of your oppressors shall be dead;
And ye shall make the game of Benevento,
Extinguishing the lights, and after that
Shall hold your supper thus:

What Color is Your Magick?

What Color is Your Magick?

By Donna Morgan on Friday, December 27, 2013 at 2:10pm

MAGIC SPELLS are of different types they are BLACK MAGICK, GREEN MAGICK, RED MAGICK, PURPLE MAGICK and WHITE MAGICK, MAGIC RINGS.

 

Personally you can call the magick any color you want with poka dots if you wish it is the intent of where and what you are gathering and sending energy. Basically there really is one magic with two intents (good or bad) and many, many traditional ways of how to carry it out. This is the diccerence and this is whay many of your elder witches do not add a color to their magic but a traditional method of carring it out. So as you can read below how confusing it can be getting cought up in lingo when it is the intent that counts.

 

BLACK MAGIC SPELLS:Includes Curses, Hexes, Jinxes, Death Spells, Casting Black Magic Spells, Black Magic Curse, Black Magic Revenge Spells, Black Magic Love Spells, Money Spells, Talismans, Black Magic Protection, Negative Magic Spells and Destructive Magic Spells.

 

Black Magic Spells can spell casted for many purposes like break up love relation, bring fights between lovers, destroying a marriage, black magic to make some one love you, destroying all your enemies, taking revenge from people who have troubled you and caused pain. Using if evil powers, demons etc to complete unfinished work. Also black magic can be used from protection from evil voodoo. With the help of black magic you can also destroy any type of hexes or curses that is on you. Use of Black Magic is practiced from the time of Ancient Era. Black Magic is also used to bring curse and hex to people unless they are destroyed or dead. Black Magic Spells are also used for Breaking Generational Curses. 

 

Curse Spells: Curse may refer to a wish that harm or hurt will be inflicted by any supernatural power, such as a spell, a prayer, an imprecation, an execration, magic, witchcraft, a god, a natural force, or a spirit. Curse may refer to a wish that harm or hurt will be inflicted by any supernatural power, such as a spell, a prayer, an imprecation, an execration, magic, witchcraft, a god, a natural force, or a spirit.Spell Casting of Curse Spells is done by Voodoo and Evil Talismans. Curse spells can be used to Break a Curse, Remove a Curse or Reverse the curse that is on you.

Hex Spells: Hex is a magical spell, usually with malevolent purposes such as a curse. Powerful Hex spells can be spell casted by power Voodoo Talismans and Charms. Hex Removal Spells are very common and are often practised. WHITE MAGIC SPELLS.White magic spells covers topics such as Destroying Black Magic Spells; Protection from Black Magic; Hex Breaking Spells; Curse Removal Spells; Protection Talismans; Healing Spells; Jinx Breaking Spells.

White magic, healing or "good" , as opposed to Black magic. White Magic is used to heal and protect oneself from evil or dangers. White magic spells play a very important role in destroying curses, hexes, jinxes and evil spells etc.  

 

RED MAGIC SPELLS.Love Spells, Love Talismans, Love Charms, Magic Love Spells, Sex Spells, Binding Love Spells, Voodoo Love Spells, Magic Marriage Spells.Red Magic Spells covers topics related to love; romance; lust; sex; fertility. They are used to bring back lost love; retrieve a lost lover or love relation; attract soul mates; bring love between two lovers. Improve a married relation; make your lover to love you more; increase desire of love between lovers; get married soon and stop delaying marriage; attain sexual fidelity; enhance libido, solve fertility and pregnancy problems. 

 

GREEN MAGIC SPELLS.Money Spells, Money Talismans, Prosperity Spells, Money Charms, Business Spells, Gambling Spells, Lottery Spells, Good Luck Spells, Become Rich Spells.

Green Magic Spells covers the topics that are related to money like having promotion in work. Getting a Better Job. Get back the lost job. Bring Back Lost Money. Bringing lots of Customers or Clients. Having success and progress in the shop. Gaining money in lottery and gambling etc. 

 

All you have to remember it what your intent of casting is!

Always cast with caution & care!

~Elder Airwolf~

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American Witch Stories

 

American Witch Stories

 books, culture 1 Response »
Jun012011
 

Whilst browsing the Library (wonderful resource), I came across a gem of a book, called The Silver Bullet and Other American Witch Stories, compiled by Hubert J. Davis (Jonathan David Publishers, Inc., 1975). The book itself is a preservation, of a previous preservation project- which collected American Witch stories and beliefs from the Appalachian Mountains. During the Depression, the Works Project Administration initiated the Virginia Writers Project, sending authors and reporters to travel over the mountain ridges and valleys of the state, recording the folklore of the people.  The intended publishing project did not materialize, however, and the transcripts were stored in the archives of the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, until they were re-discovered by Mr. Davis (a college professor and folklorist, himself descended from a line of Virginia mountain pioneers). Realizing that these folk-beliefs reflect the traditions carried from the Old World by the Scottish, Irish, and German settlers who moved into Appalachia, Davis demonstrates that (at least through the nineteenth century) Witches and Witchcraft were a “basic way of living and thinking” for the Virginia mountain-people. (One story, “The Jack-Ma-Lanterns” [p. 48], recalls a time when “Them hills wuz full of witches in them days. They done all kinds of things like spellin’ people, witchin’ varmints, and making folks sick.” Another- “A Man Rides A Witch” [p. 79]- is recounted by an eighty-year-old woman, who starts her narrative, “I’ve seen some of the gosh awfulest witch’s doings’ thet ever wuz. Some of ‘em sound impossible, but they are the truth, so help me.”)

The stories are taken primarily from elders, ranging generally from sixty to eighty, mostly between 1939 and 1941. They tend to be credited to grandparents, or sometimes to as many as four generations of story-tellers; what dates are attached tend to be “around 1800,” or “jest before the Civil War,” or something similar. (One tale- “Ball of Fire and Empty Rocker” [p. 70]- describes some men encountering a ball of fire “big as a cabin”; alarmed, they consulted “Jess Gross, a conjure man from out on Hickory Spur,” who told them that Witches threw out balls of fire “only jest afore somethin’ bad wuz about to happen.” “Shore ’nuff, hit warn’t no time ‘tall afore the Civil War broke out.” “The Bewitched Boat” [p. 72] tells how a slave-woman, “a wizzened old crone who was reputed to be a witch,” enchanted a boat so that it would not budge nor move, no matter how hard its crew strained, when her master sold her daughter to a slave-trader.)

The remarkable thing is the degree to which the Appalachian Witchcraft reflected in this volume parallels European Witchcraft of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries (hardly surprising, when one considers that Appalachia was settled from the late seventeenth century onwards, and is so remote a region that its inhabitants retained their Old World Witch-beliefs). Sympathetic Magicke is quite common, with Counter-Charming Witchcraft apparently practiced far and wide as an antidote to the Hexing variety. In “No Milk on Saturday,” p. 35, after Granny Lotz casts a spell that causes a cow to deliver bloody milk, said spell is broken when (upon the advice of “Dicey Osteen, who was known to be a witch doctor”) Stephen Ward boils the cursed milk in a pan, flailing it with birch strips; the cow was restored to health, and Granny Lotz was seen with mysterious welts on her. In one of the best stories, “Grandpappy Wuz a Witch” (p. 65), the malevolent spell is undone when Uncle Jerry skins back the bark of a tree, draws a picture of the bewitching wizard, steps backwards thirteen feet, and shoots the image while reciting, “In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Speret, break the spell of this witch.” The Magick of this milieu is definitely of the Christianized variety; a couple of stories, such as “Witchcraft and Charms” (p. 51) contain the “alphabetical acrostic” ABRACADABRA, transcribed in a descending triangle, worn around the neck as a charm or used to locate lost objects.

As in Europe, Appalachian Witches were thought able to transform into animals: in “The Strange Chestnut Tree” (p. 42), “Old Billy Jo Boggs” was “reputed to be a witch,” often seen hanging about a chestnut “known to be a witches’ tree.” Old Billy Jo could “turn himself into all kinds of animals and scare the living daylights out of folks.” However, he “always had to come to that tree before he could change back to a man.” The European folk-belief in “Witch-Riding”- that is, the belief that Witches will enter one’s bedchamber through the keyhole at night, and kidnap one to exhaust by ”riding” one as a horse, is the basis of several stories. The herbal traditions of the Wise-Woman may be seen, as in “The Horse That Wouldn’t Cross the Stream” (p. 67). Old Lizzie Steele, a “granny doctor,” has gathered ginseng, sassafras, henbane, burdock, and nightshade, for use in preparing “simples,” or the “tonics, brews, ointments, and poultices used by granny doctors.”

A noticeable thing is that, in addition to numerous individuals rumored or suspected of being “Witches” or Malicious Magick-Workers- an equally large number of folks appear to serve as “Counter-Charmers” or as consultants against harmful Craft-Work. A “Quaker doctor noted for his skill in over-looking,” or breaking spells, offers the remedy in “The Quaker Doctor and His Magic Bottle” (p. 56); Old Kate Hiller presents herself as a “yarb doctor,” brewing up a potion of “yarbs” [herbs] to treat the afflicted woman in “A Ball of Fire” (p. 64); a “Pellar,” or “White Witch,” from a Scots-Irish term, who is skilled at finding lost articles, solves the mystery of a missing timepiece in “The Pellar and the Gold Watch” (p. 59). In “The Big Brass Pin” (p. 44), Fritz Hunsacker, who “wuz a witch doctor,” agrees to tell how to get “shut” [rid] of Witches, in exchange for two hens and some acorns; the solution to “Witchcraft and Charms” (p. 51) is provided by Lige Slagle of Pineville, “who’s supposed to be a white witch.”

I think my favorite is told by Boyd J. Bolling, of his grandfather, “Grandpappy Wuz a Witch” (p. 65). Grandpappy Jim Tom Baker “wuz a conjure man, and people were afeared of him.” Bolling’s Uncle Jerry became a “kind of yarb doctor for both varmints and men; Grandpappy kept on conjurin’.” Mr. Baker possessed the skill of firing his gun- creating a space as far as the shot could be heard, that was thereafter “rung” or “hagged,” meaning that no one else could hit an animal with gunshot. An equally amusing story is that of “Why Jubal Didn’t Grow” (p. 82), which tells how Hattie Sue Kitts married Hargis Helbert- a problematic marriage, as “both Hattie Sue’s mammy and Hargis’ mammy wuz thought by some to be witches, and they didn’t like each other one bit.”  

The Silver Bullet makes for a very amusing, interesting, and informative read- not the least for reminding us that there was a time and a region (post-Salem) in American history that retained a belief in Magick-Use, Witchcraft, and the Supernatural.

Warlocks in Appalachia

Blyssful Freya's Day Legionnaires!
I came across an interesting article the has posed some teaching discrepancies in traditional beliefs, so I am posting for you all to read and give some feedback:

(Warlocks in Appalachia)
When Grandpappy Lamp Griffin discovered one morning that some of his apple trees had been relieved of their fruit, he considered that maybe Witches wuz a-pesterin’ him. According, he lit out over to old Zeb Patton’s place, so’s they could git their heads togither. “Zeb wuz a warlock and had a knack of grabblin’ with sperets and witches.”

Fans of Christian Day, please take note (because he has been campaigning of late to reclaim “Warlock” as a term for “male Witch,” rather than as a male Magicke-Worker of some dark repute): According to The Silver Bullet and Other American Witch Stories (a collection of Appalachian Witch-Lore, compiled by Hubert J. Davis and published in 1975), the word “Warlock” was in common-usage amongst the mountain-folk of Virginia around the late 1930s-early 1940s (when these stories were collected)- as a synonym for “male Witch”; demonstrated, for instance, in the tale quoted above, ”Witches With Stingers” (p. 216), which was transcribed in 1939 and based upon a tale of someone’s grandfather. (The wily mountain-Warlock, or male Witch, Old Zeb Patton, by the way, makes a bunch of Witch-Balls, or little Charms, which he hangs in the apple-orchard, attracting bees and thwarting thieves.) This story is one of the several that reference a mysterious group of people called “Melungions,” a word that Davis describes as of uncertain origin, and which denotes- get this, swear to the Gods- descendants of the original Roanoke Colonists, who famously vanished. Virginia mountain legend remembers that they ran away with Natives, inter-marrying and begetting a stand-offish Clan of individuals thought of as supernatural and inclined towards Witchcraft. (I’m madly in love with the folklore in this book.)

Another Warlock-story is “Can’t Steal” (p. 218), collected in 1939 from a local story-teller who live about 10 miles south of Roanoke, concerning the owner of the Pidgeon Creek Mill, one Nathan Lee Purky. “Now Old Nath was a warlock, and he spelled his mill so’se nobody could steal from hit. He was so sure thet his spell’ud work thet, he didn’t even have locks on the doors.” “Old Jim Tom McCoy, from out on Buck’s Knob was the seventh son of a seventh son. This gave him some magic powers, but they were effective only when he had his magic buckeye in his possession. The buckeye had a seven carved on the eye, and had been hung around his neck by his grandfather at his birth.” As one can see, this is a social environment in which Magickal beliefs and traditions are all over the place. Well, what happens is that Old Jim Tom McCoy decides to trust that his Magicke Buckeye will protect him from the Witchcraft of Old Nath the Warlock- so he tries to steal some grain from out the mill one night. Oops- Old Nath’s Magicke was mightier after all; Old Jim Tom stumbles and falls, losing his buckeye- and ends up Magickally paralyzed on the floor until morning, when Old Nath shows up to jest gloat and gloat and gloat. 

Again, in “The Disappearing Witch” (p. 222), collected in 1939, from an 84-year-old woman who remembered the story as a child from her grandmother (this is a wonderful story; I wish I could go into it further without getting tediously off-subject, as it actually has an element of faerey-tale about it): a trio of “Warlocks” decide to rob the country-store/ post-office one Christmas, knowing that liquor ordered for the holidays was kept there. Gathering in front of the store, they rubbed a special lotion onto themselves. Then the “first warlock to reach the door said, ‘Through the keyhole I go.’ He shrank and slipped right through the keyhole.”

So the other two do likewise; inside the store, “the warlocks collected the liquor, some money and other goods, and then decided to sample some of the liquor on the spot.” Well, the store-owner has been hiding out in the store, and surprises them at this point. Two get away, but he seizes the third “warlock” and locks him in the closet. The next morning, his crone-wife comes looking for her man; the store-owner and others apprehend her as well, and are just ready to string up both the Crone and her Warlock-Husband, when (sometimes there is something in these stories that is so Celtic, you remember that the Appalachians were settled largely by the Scots and Irish): “But bless my soul! A flock of large black crows swooped right down over those witches and said, ‘Caw! Caw! Caw! Up! Up! Up! in the air we go.’ The old crone replied, ‘And I after you,’ and she flew right out of the rope and up in the air and disappeared like a puff of smoke. Well, the old man was so surprised at this that he was too confused to figure out how to follow her.” The horses, startled by the old woman’s flying departure, bolt- and the old Warlock is hanged after all. Yet the community wasn’t “hagged” by Witches anymore.

It is in a fascinating story concerning Native Americans, “The Indian Warlocks From Acoma” (p. 74) that Davis identifies “Warlock” as meaning ”a male witch.” This tale, from a 1936 collection of Pueblo lore, concerns two “Warlocks,” or “members of the Witch Society of Acoma.” Detailing a ritual Pow-Wow at the enchanted mesa, the story is too full of interesting elements not to save for closer examination later (it is the remarkable parallels between this Native American story and Appalachian/ European Witchcraft that causes Davis to include it in his book). Nonetheless, it is “Warlocks” or “Male Witches” (indigenous to the Western Plains) that provide the story’s title.

However- one last mountain-tale that reflects the Appalachian conception of a “male Witch” as a “Warlock.” This story is really interesting, as the story-teller was the grandson of the preacher in question, and the nephew of the man-turned-Warlock. A fiery backwoods Baptist has one of his sons rebel against him in “Delivered Up To The Devil” (p. 20). Despite quotations from Scripture (“Hit sez in Exodus, ‘Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live!’ Again in Leviticus, ‘A man also or a woman thet hath a familiar speret, er thet is a wizard, shall surely be put to death; they shall stone ‘em with stones; their blud shall be upon ‘em”), his son leaves to become a “conjure man.” Tracking down the “chief witch” of a particular “pack” of Witches, he asks her, “What does hit take for you to make a conjure man outten me? I want the whole works: to be able to cast spells, to change into varmints, to fly through the air, to find lost things, and to do all tother things any warlock can do.”

Well, she tells him what to do (it involves finding a spring whose stream runs due east; it also involves selling his soul to the Devil), but all for no good end; “Jonas Dotson lived to be an old man, and became notorious for his evil deeds. He harassed the people and became such a terror that finally he was arrested by Old Doc Taylor and hanged at Wise Courthouse for a brutal murder.”

Be that as it may- please note that (in his mind), being a Conjure Man and being a Warlock are the same thing, and both involve all the customary powers of the Witch- casting spells, changing into animals, flying, and clairvoyance.

Based upon the evidence of this book, “Warlock” would seem to be a word in common-use among Appalachian mountain-folk of presumably the 1800s (certainly the early 1900s), that described a “male Witch.” As the area was so heavily settled by the Scots and the Irish, it would appear to be a Celtic identification of some kind. It seems to have entered common American usage enough by the 1960s that Bewitched picked up on it as a term for male Witches. It is remarkable the many variations Virginia mountain-culture observes regarding: Conjure Men; Granny Doctors; Yarb Doctors; Witch Doctors; Gun Witches (this is a Witch who can spell/ unspell guns); Pellars (from a Scots-Irish term meaning a “White Witch”); and Warlocks- meaning a male Witch.
Hum!
Responses are encouraged!

Appalachian Folk Magic - Granny Magic Tradition:

Appalachian Folk Magic - Granny Magic Tradition: 

The Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition of Witchcraft is one that is only recently being heard of. Though the tradition is a very old one, dating all the way back to the first settlers of the magical Appalachian Mountains who came over from Scotland and Ireland in the 1700's. They brought along their even older Irish and Scottish Magical Traditions with them. Those two 'old world' Traditions were then blended with a dash of the local tradition of the Tsalagi (Now, called the Cherokee Indians.) The recipe for the Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition was then complete, though this potion simmered on a low boil for many generations before anyone dubbed it with the name, 'Appalachian Granny Magic.' 

The Witches of the Appalachian Mountains called themselves 'Water Witches' and/or 'Witch Doctors' depending upon whether they were personally more gifted in healing, midwifery and such realms of magic, or if they were more in tune with dowsing for water, ley lines, energy vortexes and the making of charms and potions. Often a Practitioner called themselves by both titles if they were so diverse in their Magical practices. 

The Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition, like many of the older ones, was passed on from parents to their children for many generations, and generally was not 'taught' outside of the individual family structures. Because of the rural and secluded nature of the Appalachian community, the old customs, wisdom, and practices were not as often lost, forgotten, or 'modernized' as the 'old world' traditions that came over to other, more urban areas of the 'new world.' Therefore, one will often find that ancient Irish or Scottish songs, rhymes, dances, recipes, crafts, and 'The Craft,' are more accurately preserved in Appalachia than even in Ireland or Scotland. 

Many of these old Scot/Irish traditions, as well as the Tsalagi traditions, both magical and mundane, were carried on in Appalachia until modern times. Some songs, spells, and such have been passed down for many years that way, though sadly, sometimes only by rote, with the original meanings beings lost in the shifting sands of time. In the secluded mountains of Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, the Virginias and the Carolinas, this denomination of the ancient religion of Witchcraft continued right on through the decades of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and the early twentieth centuries; a time when Witchcraft elsewhere was being nearly forgotten and abandoned by the increasingly modern and monotheistic world. The people of the mountains still relied upon Mother Nature in a way, that 'city folk' did not anymore. 

The fertility of the crops, the livestock, and of the people themselves was as paramount to the Appalachians of 1900 as it was to the early American colonists in the 1600's. Therefore, fertility, and the worship of Mother Nature, Jack frost, Father Winter, Chloe, Spider Grandmother, Demeter, and such varied deities continued in the Appalachian region, staying a current part of the people's faith, rather than becoming a mythic memory as such 'nature worship' did elsewhere. In fact, we still see "Lady Plenty and Lady Liberty" Goddess of the harvest, with cornucopia in hand, and Goddess of freedom, on the official North Carolina State seal. 

Amazingly, even the terms "Witch"", "Witchcraft", "spells", "charms" and such never became taboo in the modern Appalachian culture. Nearly every mountain top and 'holler' community had their local 'Witch' who was openly called such, as a title of honor, not as a insult or a charge of crime, as the term came to be used in other more urban American cultures of the seventeen, eighteen and nineteen hundreds. 

The "Witch Doctors" were still called upon to heal a sick child, or deliver a baby, or tend to the dying, as Witches had been so charged with doing in Europe during ancient times. Since often a mountain community had no medical doctor to call upon, the local Witches continued to work as the only healers, well up until the early twentieth century. 

The local 'Witch' was also called upon to dowse for water, ley lines, and energy vortexes when one was digging a well, planting a new garden, burying a loved one, or doing any other work with the Earth. Thereby, the term 'Water Witch' arose, though, it is misleading, as these Witches dowsed for more than just water, and one did not have to be a Witch to dowse, though most dowsers of that era and location were, indeed, Witches. 

The fairy folk, leprechauns, and other 'wee people,' followed the Scots and Irishmen to Appalachia, it seems, as the Witches of this tradition continue to work closely with these beings. Of course, the Tsalagi people had their own such beings, here when the Scots and Irishmen arrived. The Tsalagi called their magical being neighbors; 'Yunwi Tsunsdi,' which translates to 'The Little People.' Offerings are still commonly given to the wee people daily in Appalachia. To this day, you will find a granny woman leaving a bowl of cream on her back door step, or throwing a bite of her cornbread cake out a window, before placing it upon her families' table. 

The spirits of the dead are often worked with as well, a lot of ancestral spirit guide workings are passed down through our Tradition, those practices trace back to not only Scotland and Ireland, but the Tsalagi Nation as well. 'Haints' are widely feared as 'angry' ancestral spirits, and many spells, charms, and rituals are practiced to keep these troublemakers at bay. One of the most interesting and common haint related spells requires that the doors of a home be painted 'haint blue.' Haint Blue is a bright baby blue with a periwinkle tinge, very close to but about one shade darker than the Carolina Tarheels' Blue color. This color is believed to repel the spirits and keep them out of the home. Music is a large part of the Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition. Many of the oldest spells are sung and danced. Clogging, as Irish Step-dancing came to be called in Appalachia, as well as reels, gigs, lullabies, and chants sung in rounds are all very common magical ingredients in Appalachian spells. For example, a traditional Earth Blessing to be sung while planting and harvesting goes; (Broken into syllables for easier pronunciation of the ancient Tsalagi language, English translation follows) 


A da we hi a ne he ne ha 
Do hi u a iu ni 
O lo hi a li ga lu lo hi u nah ta 
Ga li e li ga O sa da du 

Wise Protectors, they are so giving 
Serenity, it resounds 
Mother Earth and Father Sky are so giving 
I am thankful, it is good 



Another example of the old world musical roots of Appalachian musical magic is the locally common use of the song 'Auld Lang Syne' for Samhain and Funerals, as well as the secular new year. 

Divination is popular among Appalachian Granny Witches. Many read Tarot, and regular playing cards, tea leaves, and clouds. Scrying in bowls of water, dirt, or sand is also common. Spider webs are scrutinized for messages from the Cherokee Spider Grandmother Goddess, a Goddess of fate, magic, weaving, art and storytelling, who is said to weave magical messages into the webs of her creatures. (In Tsalagi, She was called; 'Kanene Ski Amai Yehi.' 

Many traditional witches do not believe in a supreme power. Instead, they believe that we all have a spirit, all animals and plants have a spirit, and all things of the Earth have a spirit, and all are equal. Instead of being a higher power to "worship," generally speaking, witches simply believe in an equality of all spirit and that all spirit is a part of the universal energies, or gods and goddesses. The modern concept that "all gods are one god,"and has no origins in Europe or with any witchcraft traditions. Witches of the past believed in and revered the pantheons of their ancestors and believed each god and goddess was a separate entity, not that all were "aspects" of one great universal god. Some witches of today do accept the "all gods are one god" concept, but this belief did not originate with witchcraft traditions of the past. 

There are some spells and incantations native to Appalachia that are still practiced today. To get someone to fall in love with you, you can place cowslip or dogwood blossoms (three of either one) under a chair in which you expect your desired love to sit. If they sit in the seat and while sitting there happen to glance in your direction they will not be able to think about anyone else until after midnight. After midnight the enchantment will be broken and the spell will have to be repeated. To keep a ghost from following you, you should walk briskly to your home without running. Just before you reach your front door, stop and spin quickly three times counterclockwise. As you do this, chant a banishing chant such as this: "Ghoulies, ghosties, shades of the dead; turning, spinning, dizzy in the head." This chant is supposed to confuse the spirits so they can no longer follow you. To counteract enchantment or witchcraft you can: remove the door of the hexed house, turn it around three times, and replace it on its hinges. You can sleep with something holy under your pillow. You can also stand on a tree stump and wave an ash twig over the victim's head thirteen times.

Witch Mark

A witch mark in Appalachia, a rural portion of the southeastern United States, is a star, similar to the Maltese cross, which is etched or drawn over the doorway of a house or barn, to keep witches away. Also, it can be cut out of wood and nailed over the door. 

Weather Prediction

To the country folk of Appalachia, the ability to predict the weather by watching the rising of chimney smoke was crucial to survival. It is actually very easy to learn how to read these signals. Here are some points to remember to divine the weather from smoke: When smoke rises straight up, even during rain or snow, it means the weather will clear soon. If the smoke hangs low near the roof, precipitation will occur within the next twenty-four hours. If smoke hangs low, but birds are active, the weather will clear soon. And if smoke drifts back down the chimney, the weather is about to change. Watching the weather can enhance certain magical activities, such as fire divination and spirit contact. 


From "In the Graveyard at Midnight" by Edain McCoy

"Appalachian Magic" Elsbeth, Marguerite

The Encyclopedia of Witches and Witchcraft Guiley, Rosemary Ellen

Blessings,
Spiral
 

Appalachian Granny Magic

Appalachian Granny Magic

Author: Ginger Strivelli 
Posted: January 8th. 2001 
Times Viewed: 79,107 

The Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition of Witchcraft is one that is only recently being heard of. Though the tradition is a very old one, dating all the way back to the first settlers of the magical Appalachian Mountains who came over from Scotland and Ireland in the 1700's. They brought along their even older Irish and Scottish Magical Traditions with them. Those two 'old world' Traditions were then blended with a dash of the local tradition of the Tsalagi (Now, called the Cherokee Indians.) The recipe for the Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition was then complete, though this potion simmered on a low boil for many generations before anyone dubbed it with the name, 'Appalachian Granny Magic.'

The Witches of the Appalachian Mountains called themselves 'Water Witches' and/or 'Witch Doctors' depending upon whether they were personally more gifted in healing, midwifery and such realms of magic, or if they were more in tune with dowsing for water, ley lines, energy vortexes and the making of charms and potions. Often a Practitioner called themselves by both titles if they were so diverse in their Magical practices.

The Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition, like many of the older ones, was passed on from parents to their children for many generations, and generally was not 'taught' outside of the individual family structures. Because of the rural and secluded nature of the Appalachian community, the old customs, wisdom, and practices were not as often lost, forgotten, or 'modernized' as the 'old world' traditions that came over to other, more urban areas of the 'new world.' Therefore, one will often find that ancient Irish or Scottish songs, rhymes, dances, recipes, crafts, and 'The Craft,' are more accurately preserved in Appalachia than even in Ireland or Scotland.

Many of these old Scot/Irish traditions, as well as the Tsalagi traditions, both magical and mundane, were carried on in Appalachia until modern times. Some songs, spells, and such have been passed down for many years that way, though sadly, sometimes only by rote, with the original meanings beings lost in the shifting sands of time.

In the secluded mountains of Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, the Virginias and the Carolinas, this denomination of the ancient religion of Witchcraft continued right on through the decades of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and the early twentieth centuries; a time when Witchcraft elsewhere was being nearly forgotten and abandoned by the increasingly modern and monotheistic world. The people of the mountains still relied upon Mother Nature in a way, that 'city folk' did not anymore. The fertility of the crops, the livestock, and of the people themselves was as paramount to the Appalachians of 1900 as it was to the early American colonists in the 1600's. Therefore, fertility, and the worship of Mother Nature, Jack frost, Father Winter, Chloe, Spider Grandmother, Demeter, and such varied deities continued in the Appalachian region, staying a current part of the people's faith, rather than becoming a mythic memory as such 'nature worship' did elsewhere. In fact, we still see "Lady Plenty and Lady Liberty" Goddess of the harvest, with cornucopia in hand, and Goddess of freedom, on the official North Carolina State seal.

Amazingly, even the terms "Witch"", "Witchcraft", "spells", "charms" and such never became taboo in the modern Appalachian culture. Nearly every mountain top and 'holler' community had their local 'Witch' who was openly called such, as a title of honor, not as a insult or a charge of crime, as the term came to be used in other more urban American cultures of the seventeen, eighteen and nineteen hundreds.

The "Witch Doctors" were still called upon to heal a sick child, or deliver a baby, or tend to the dying, as Witches had been so charged with doing in Europe during ancient times. Since often a mountain community had no medical doctor to call upon, the local Witches continued to work as the only healers, well up until the early twentieth century.

The local 'Witch' was also called upon to dowse for water, ley lines, and energy vortexes when one was digging a well, planting a new garden, burying a loved one, or doing any other work with the Earth. Thereby, the term 'Water Witch' arose, though, it is misleading, as these Witches dowsed for more than just water, and one did not have to be a Witch to dowse, though most dowsers of that era and location were, indeed, Witches.

The fairy folk, leprechauns, and other 'wee people,' followed the Scots and Irishmen to Appalachia, it seems, as the Witches of this tradition continue to work closely with these beings. Of course, the Tsalagi people had their own such beings, here when the Scots and Irishmen arrived. The Tsalagi called their magical being neighbors; 'Yunwi Tsunsdi,' which translates to 'The Little People.' Offerings are still commonly given to the wee people daily in Appalachia. To this day, you will find a granny woman leaving a bowl of cream on her back door step, or throwing a bite of her cornbread cake out a window, before placing it upon her families' table.

The spirits of the dead are often worked with as well, a lot of ancestral spirit guide workings are passed down through our Tradition, those practices trace back to not only Scotland and Ireland, but the Tsalagi Nation as well. 'Haints' are widely feared as 'angry' ancestral spirits, and many spells, charms, and rituals are practiced to keep these troublemakers at bay. One of the most interesting and common haint related spells requires that the doors of a home be painted 'haint blue.' Haint Blue is a bright baby blue with a periwinkle tinge, very close to but about one shade darker than the Carolina Tarheels' Blue color. This color is believed to repel the spirits and keep them out of the home.

Music is a large part of the Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition. Many of the oldest spells are sung and danced. Clogging, as Irish Step-dancing came to be called in Appalachia, as well as reels, gigs, lullabies, and chants sung in rounds are all very common magical ingredients in Appalachian spells. For example, a traditional Earth Blessing to be sung while planting and harvesting goes; (Broken into syllables for easier pronunciation of the ancient Tsalagi language, English translation follows)
 

A da we hi a ne he ne ha
Do hi u a iu ni
O lo hi a li ga lu lo hi u nah ta
Ga li e li ga O sa da du

Wise Protectors, they are so giving
Serenity, it resounds
Mother Earth and Father Sky are so giving
I am thankful, it is good

Another example of the old world musical roots of Appalachian musical magic is the locally common use of the song 'Auld Lang Syne' for Samhain and Funerals, as well as the secular new year.

Divination is popular among Appalachian Granny Witches. Many read Tarot, and regular playing cards, tea leaves, and clouds. Scrying in bowls of water, dirt, or sand is also common. Spider webs are scrutinized for messages from the Cherokee Spider Grandmother Goddess, a Goddess of fate, magic, weaving, art and storytelling, who is said to weave magical messages into the webs of her creatures. (In Tsalagi, She was called; 'Kanene Ski Amai Yehi.')

"The Weaver" Painting By Ginger Strivelli The tools of the Appalachian Granny Witch vary a bit from the modern 'Wiccan' tools we all are so familiar with. The Wand, often instead called the 'rod', as it is in fact a dowsing rod, is the most important tool. This is usually a long straight rod, rather than the 'forked stick' type dowsing rod used by mundane dowsers. It is generally made of wood from a flowering tree such as dogwood, apple or peach, (For Water dowsing) or made from a metal, (For ley line or energy dowsing) copper conducts energy best, I personally feel. A ritual blade, such as a Athame, is only occasionally used and more often a agricultural blade like a thresher, ax or such will be used in its stead. Cauldrons are used more widely than chalices, in fact, a cauldron placed in ones front yard was a 'open-for-business' type Witches' sign in times gone by, much like a barber's pole is used today. However, that practice has become a popular decoration in the South in recent decades, and one is likely to find a person has a cauldron decorating their front yard, because they saw it in 'Southern Homes Magazine' and thought it was quaintly attractive, rather than it being used to advertise that the 'Witch is in,' so to speak. Mirrors, candles, brooms, pottery, and baskets are other common tools of the Tradition, and all of those items are still commonly made at home, by hand in the mountains of Appalachia.

As most of the Magic of the Tradition is of a healing, practical or sympathetic nature rather than "High" or Ritualistic in form, and there are some differences related to that. Ritual clothing is generally not used, and circles are not cast for every spell, only the more formal rites. An Appalachian Witch, like myself, might do a dozen or more spells in any given day, often with two or three generations of practitioners taking part, so running in to change clothes, or stopping to cast a full circle in the 'strict' form would be rather impractical, and in fact, neither was commonly done in the past, in our Tradition. Although some modern Appalachian Witches, being eclectic already with our Scottish, Irish, and Tsalagi roots, have started to use some other Traditions' practices (such as wearing ritual clothing, casting a formal circle, etc.) at times, as well.

We, as a Magical Tradition, are very practical, and 'down-to-earth.' We are very eclectic, and informal in our approach to Witchcraft. It is our way of life, as well as our religion. And we are working to preserve both, for the future generations of Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition Witches.

Resources:
Mountain Magick by Edain McCoy
Voices of Our Ancestors by Dhyani Ywahoo
Scottish Witchcraft by Raymond Buckland
Celtic Myth and Magic by McCoy
Myths of the Cherokee James Mooney
Appalachian Pagan Alliance website 

Appalachian Magick

Protection Charms, Spells, Curses & more from the mountains of Appalachia

Appalachian magicks are definitely a flavor unto themselves. Some of the practices have their roots in various European traditions but have a bit of Native American lore thrown in as well. Follow the links below to discover the lore concerning each topic. The same links are offered to the left but their titles had to be abbreviated.

Be warned: The information provided is NOT meant to be practiced. Some of the spells and undoings involve killing animals. The information is presented for its historical value ONLY.

Death Omens and Their Undoing

(Warning: some of these methods include harming and killing animals. They are presented as historical information and not intended to be used.)

Mountain Folk (as well as the Irish) believe that a raven that nests on the roof is an omen that a death will occur within a fortnight. To undo this omen you must scare away the ravens before they leave of their own accord. This must be accomplished without the use of human gestures or voices. To do so means that the death will occur in half the original amount of time. Gunshots, rocks and or other animals have been traditionally used.

Black birds who come to rest on a windowsill is a bad omen. If it takes something and for caws while it is there the omen means a death in the family. There are two ways to undo the omens. If it only takes something, you must retrieve the stolen item. If it caws, you must kill the bird and then burn it in a cemetery. Please not that there is a difference between blackbirds and crows. Crows indicate a blight on your land or a famine.

Protection From The Dead and Prevention of Hauntings

Dried basil hung over the doorways, windows, & fireplaces will keep ghosts from entering.
Rue or Purslane planted near the house discourages ghostly visitors.
Wild horseradish or mustard placed under a pillow will prevent nightmares induced by ghosts.
Spinning clockwise 3 times before entering your dwelling reportedly confuses spirits so they cannot enter.
Rapping 3 times on your door post before entering deters ghosts.
Rapping 3 times on your bedpost also deters ghosts from inducing nightmares.
Bells, chimes, and door harps are ancient methods of deterring ghosts stemming from China and Scandinavia.

Serving a plate of potatoes to a ghost just after sundown is another ghost banishing method. When leaving the plate announce that it is for the spirit. Just before dawn, bury the potatoes and the spirit should go with them.If you know the identity of the spirit, and have access to their belongings there is a North Carolina Blue Ridge Mountain potato banishing that might be useful.

Take an unwashed, unpeeled potato and cut it in half. Then hollow out a small section, leaving fairly thick walls. Place a small, non-valued item belonging to the deceased inside the hollow space. Then use two long nails or pins to reseal the potato. Take it to the cemetery where they are buried and leave it. The ghost should be bound to the cemetery until its ready to move on.

If you feel you are being followed by an evil spirit, cross over running water. It is said that spirits cannot cross over running water.

To turn away negative forces of human, spectral or animal nature, toss nine broom straws, one at a time, on a hearth fire at sunset.

Squeaky doors should be fixed because they are invitations to ghosts and troublesome spirits.

Windows can be protected with sprigs of fresh rosemary, basil, and woodruff.

Prevention of Curses and Undoing Curses

Prevent a curse, tie up a lock of your hair, a stick from your yard and a clipped nail with red string and carry it in your pocket. Curses cannot affect you as long as you carry the charm. If you lose it, however, it can be used against you by competent enemies.

The broken mirror curse (i.e. seven years bad luck) can be undone by taking the largest shard to the cemetery and touching it to the oldest headstone at midnight.

Placing a fern or ivy on the porch will protect against curses. If its eaten by an animal, then a curse is already in place. Planting dill with the fern protects it against animals.

Yarrow or Pixie Lichen Moss hung on a crib will drive away curses and negativity. This can also be achieved by driving a nail into the crib post.

Milk containing chamomile fed to a child each night was said to protect it from evil and preserve its life 'til dawn.

Appalachian Tree Lore

Oak logs burned in the hearth helps strengthen the home against natural disasters
Pine and Cedar logs burned in the hearth brings prosperity
Birch logs burned in the hearth brings happiness
Elm protects against curses and evil
Basil and Rosemary tossed into a fire protects and brings happiness.

Love Charms and Spells

Collect a handful of violet buds, think thoughts of romance and then toss them in front of you. Look at the patterns they form on the ground. They should suggest a name or the initials of your future mate. If you get better results with white blossoms then your mate will always be faithful. If you get better results with purple blossoms your marriage will be passionate.

Tossing myrtle into a fire is said to cause the face of your future mate to appear.

A white dove flying over your house is an omen that there will be a marriage in your family within a year.

Odds and ends

To prevent a miscarriage, carry a piece of mottled jasper (also known as bloodstone) in your left pocket.
Blue glass (such as a bottle) in a window repels negativity.
Iron above the doors and fireplace repels unwanted faery folk.
A saucer placed above a door will turn away thieves.
Appalachians 'smudged' their homes with a 'purging incense:' a combination of dried valerian root, dried basil, and rue (not pleasant smelling). In some areas it is traditional to have the oldest member of the household carry the incense while the youngest carries a lit candle and walks behind them.
Horseshoes placed above doorways bring good luck and blessings (originally from Irish folklore).
Dried leather beans strung together and hung over the door brings good luck and protection.
Seeing a cardinal (or "red bird") means you will have unexpected visitors.
Dreams are usually interpreted by their contraries (e.g., dreams of death or a funeral indicates pregnancy of someone you know, and vice versa).
Placing a hat on a table results in unexpected guests, usually unpleasant ones.
If your right palm itches you are going to receive money.
If your left palm itches, you will have an unexpected bill or loss of money.

These were submitted via email to me from Scott who lives in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. Submitted by Patty German who learned of these from her grandmother. http://www.whiterosesgarden.com/book_of_shadows/other_books/appalachian/appalach_contents_pgs/APP_INDEX_PG.htm

Appalachian Granny Magic Author

Ginger Strivelli

The Appalachian Granny

Magic Tradition of Witchcraft is one that is only recently being heard of. Though the tradition is a very old one, dating all the way back to the first settlers of the magical Appalachian Mountains who came over from Scotland and Ireland in the 1700's. They brought along their even older Irish and Scottish Magical Traditions with them. Those two 'old world' Traditions were then blended with a dash of the local tradition of the Tsalagi (Now, called the Cherokee Indians.) The recipe for the Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition was then complete, though this potion simmered on a low boil for many generations before anyone dubbed it with the name, 'Appalachian Granny Magic.' The Witches of the Appalachian Mountains called themselves 'Water Witches' and/or 'Witch Doctors' depending upon whether they were personally more gifted in healing, midwifery and such realms of magic, or if they were more in tune with dowsing for water, ley lines, energy vortexes and the making of charms and potions.

Often a Practitioner called themselves by both titles if they were so diverse in their Magical practices. The Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition, like many of the older ones, was passed on from parents to their children for many generations, and generally was not 'taught' outside of the individual family structures. Because of the rural and secluded nature of the Appalachian community, the old customs, wisdom, and practices were not as often lost, forgotten, or 'modernized' as the 'old world' traditions that came over to other, more urban areas of the 'new world.' Therefore, one will often find that ancient Irish or Scottish songs, rhymes, dances, recipes, crafts, and 'The Craft,' are more accurately preserved in Appalachia than even in Ireland or Scotland. Many of these old Scot/Irish traditions, as well as the Tsalagi traditions, both magical and mundane, were carried on in Appalachia until modern times. Some songs, spells, and such have been passed down for many years that way, though sadly, sometimes only by rote, with the original meanings beings lost in the shifting sands of time.

In the secluded mountains of Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, the Virginias and the Carolinas, this denomination of the ancient religion of Witchcraft continued right on through the decades of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and the early twentieth centuries; a time when Witchcraft elsewhere was being nearly forgotten and abandoned by the increasingly modern and monotheistic world. The people of the mountains still relied upon Mother Nature in a way, that 'city folk' did not anymore. The fertility of the crops, the livestock, and of the people themselves was as paramount to the Appalachians of 1900 as it was to the early American colonists in the 1600's. Therefore, fertility, and the worship of Mother Nature, Jack frost, Father Winter, Chloe, Spider Grandmother, Demeter, and such varied deities continued in the Appalachian region, staying a current part of the people's faith, rather than becoming a mythic memory as such 'nature worship' did elsewhere. In fact, we still see "Lady Plenty and Lady Liberty" Goddess of the harvest, with cornucopia in hand, and Goddess of freedom, on the official North Carolina State seal.

Amazingly, even the terms "Witch"", "Witchcraft", "spells", "charms" and such never became taboo in the modern Appalachian culture. Nearly every mountain top and 'holler' community had their local 'Witch' who was openly called such, as a title of honor, not as a insult or a charge of crime, as the term came to be used in other more urban American cultures of the seventeen, eighteen and nineteen hundreds. The "Witch Doctors" were still called upon to heal a sick child, or deliver a baby, or tend to the dying, as Witches had been so charged with doing in Europe during ancient times. Since often a mountain community had no medical doctor to call upon, the local Witches continued to work as the only healers, well up until the early twentieth century. The local 'Witch' was also called upon to dowse for water, ley lines, and energy vortexes when one was digging a well, planting a new garden, burying a loved one, or doing any other work with the Earth. Thereby, the term 'Water Witch' arose, though, it is misleading, as these Witches dowsed for more than just water, and one did not have to be a Witch to dowse, though most dowsers of that era and location were, indeed, Witches.

The fairy folk, leprechauns, and other 'wee people,' followed the Scots and Irishmen to Appalachia, it seems, as the Witches of this tradition continue to work closely with these beings. Of course, the Tsalagi people had their own such beings, here when the Scots and Irishmen arrived. The Tsalagi called their magical being neighbors; 'Yunwi Tsunsdi,' which translates to 'The Little People.' Offerings are still commonly given to the wee people daily in Appalachia. To this day, you will find a granny woman leaving a bowl of cream on her back door step, or throwing a bite of her cornbread cake out a window, before placing it upon her families' table. The spirits of the dead are often worked with as well, a lot of ancestral spirit guide workings are passed down through our Tradition, those practices trace back to not only Scotland and Ireland, but the Tsalagi Nation as well. 'Haints' are widely feared as 'angry' ancestral spirits, and many spells, charms, and rituals are practiced to keep these troublemakers at bay. One of the most interesting and common haint related spells requires that the doors of a home be painted 'haint blue.' Haint Blue is a bright baby blue with a periwinkle tinge, very close to but about one shade darker than the Carolina Tarheels' Blue color.

This color is believed to repel the spirits and keep them out of the home. Music is a large part of the Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition. Many of the oldest spells are sung and danced. Clogging, as Irish Step-dancing came to be called in Appalachia, as well as reels, gigs, lullabies, and chants sung in rounds are all very common magical ingredients in Appalachian spells. For example, a traditional Earth Blessing to be sung while planting and harvesting goes; (Broken into syllables for easier pronunciation of the ancient Tsalagi language, English translation follows) A da we hi a ne he ne ha Do hi u a iu ni O lo hi a li ga lu lo hi u nah ta Ga li e li ga O sa da du Wise Protectors, they are so giving Serenity, it resounds Mother Earth and Father Sky are so giving I am thankful, it is good Another example of the old world musical roots of Appalachian musical magic is the locally common use of the song 'Auld Lang Syne' for Samhain and Funerals, as well as the secular new year.

Divination is popular among Appalachian Granny Witches. Many read Tarot, and regular playing cards, tea leaves, and clouds. Scrying in bowls of water, dirt, or sand is also common. Spider webs are scrutinized for messages from the Cherokee Spider Grandmother Goddess, a Goddess of fate, magic, weaving, art and storytelling, who is said to weave magical messages into the webs of her creatures. (In Tsalagi, She was called; 'Kanene Ski Amai Yehi.') "The Weaver" Painting By Ginger Strivelli The tools of the Appalachian Granny Witch vary a bit from the modern 'Wiccan' tools we all are so familiar with. The Wand, often instead called the 'rod', as it is in fact a dowsing rod, is the most important tool. This is usually a long straight rod, rather than the 'forked stick' type dowsing rod used by mundane dowsers. It is generally made of wood from a flowering tree such as dogwood, apple or peach, (For Water dowsing) or made from a metal, (For ley line or energy dowsing) copper conducts energy best, I personally feel.

A ritual blade, such as a Athame, is only occasionally used and more often a agricultural blade like a thresher, ax or such will be used in its stead. Cauldrons are used more widely than chalices, in fact, a cauldron placed in ones front yard was a 'open-for-business' type Witches' sign in times gone by, much like a barber's pole is used today. However, that practice has become a popular decoration in the South in recent decades, and one is likely to find a person has a cauldron decorating their front yard, because they saw it in 'Southern Homes Magazine' and thought it was quaintly attractive, rather than it being used to advertise that the 'Witch is in,' so to speak. Mirrors, candles, brooms, pottery, and baskets are other common tools of the Tradition, and all of those items are still commonly made at home, by hand in the mountains of Appalachia. As most of the Magic of the Tradition is of a healing, practical or sympathetic nature rather than "High" or Ritualistic in form, and there are some differences related to that.

Ritual clothing is generally not used, and circles are not cast for every spell, only the more formal rites. An Appalachian Witch, like myself, might do a dozen or more spells in any given day, often with two or three generations of practitioners taking part, so running in to change clothes, or stopping to cast a full circle in the 'strict' form would be rather impractical, and in fact, neither was commonly done in the past, in our Tradition. Although some modern Appalachian Witches, being eclectic already with our Scottish, Irish, and Tsalagi roots, have started to use some other Traditions' practices (such as wearing ritual clothing, casting a formal circle, etc.) at times, as well. We, as a Magical Tradition, are very practical, and 'down-to-earth.' We are very eclectic, and informal in our approach to Witchcraft. It is our way of life, as well as our religion. And we are working to preserve both, for the future generations of Appalachian Granny Magic Tradition Witches.

Resources:

Mountain Magick by Edain McCoy
Voices of Our Ancestors by Dhyani Ywahoo
Scottish Witchcraft by Raymond Buckland
Celtic Myth and Magic by Edain McCoy
Myths of the Cherokee James Mooney

Appalachian Granny Magic

Contributed by: firewytch

Appalachian Granny Magic is only recently being heard of by many people even though the tradition is very old, dating all the way back to the first settlers of the Appalachian Mountains. In the 1700's immigrants came and brought along their Irish and Scottish traditions. Those two traditions were then blended with the local traditions of the Cherokee Indians. Although it has been around for a long time there is very little information written about it. It is known to be an earth based tradition passed on by Scottish, Irish and Cherokee ancestors. It is the belief that nature is sacred. The Appalachian Witch respects and reveres nature however they do not worship it.

Appalachian Granny Magic was passed on from parents to their children for many generations and usually was not passed outside of the family. The Appalachian communities were small, rural and secluded, so the customs, wisdom, and practices were not as often lost, forgotten, or modernized. Because of this many of the ancient Irish or Scottish songs, rhymes, dances, spells, rituals and 'The Craft,' were more accurately preserved in Appalachia than in most other places in the world. Many of the Scot/Irish traditions, as well as the Cherokee traditions, have been carried on in Appalachia up to this day. In the secluded mountains of the South Eastern United States, this form of Witchcraft continued right on through the decades of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and the twentieth centuries; a time when Witchcraft was being forgotten and abandoned by the world. The people of the mountains still relied upon Mother Nature.

The fertility of the crops, the livestock, and of the people themselves was as important to the Appalachians of the 1900’s as it was to the immigrants in the 1600's. Mother Nature, Jack Frost, Father Winter and other deities continued in the Appalachian region, as a part of the people's beliefs. Most Appalachian Witches believe that all people have a spirit; that all things of the earth have a spirit. They believe that spirits are a part of nature but not a part of the energy of god; they do not believe in many gods and goddesses as separate entities, they believe in one universal GOD.

Appalachian Witches observe the sabbats, solstices and equinoxes, but do not relate them to mythology; it is the seasonal changes that they recognize. The terms ‘Witch,’ Witchcraft’, ‘spells’ and ‘charms’ never became taboo in Appalachia; nearly every mountain top and holler had their 'Witch'; although practitioners usually called themselves cunning or wise women. Local folk went to the wise ones for prophecy, and protection, for delivering babies, healing with herbs, and other remedies and cures; providing abortions, love potions, and poisons; divination and casting of curses and blessings, or care for the dying. Often a mountain community had no doctor to call, the Witches were the only healers available to them,well into the twentieth century. (The local 'Witch' was also called upon to dowse for water.)

Fairy and leprechaun lore was brought by the Scots and Irish to Appalachia and the Witches continued to believe in them. The Cherokee people had their own magical beings when the Scots and Irish arrived. Offerings are still given to little people in Appalachia; it is as simple as leaving a bowl of milk on the door step or throwing a piece of cornbread out a window for them. Working with spirits of the dead and ancestral spirit guide workings were also passed down, these practices trace back to Scotland, Ireland and the Cherokee Nation. Spirits were shown respect; believed to be those who passed before… ancestors, family; but not all spirits are believed to be helpful, some can be troublesome. 'Haints' are feared spirits; spells, charms, and rituals are practiced to keep them away. One of the most common ‘haint’ related spells requires that the porch ceiling of a home be painted ‘haint’ blue. This is believed to keep the ‘haints’ out of the home. Divination is popular in Appalachia.

Many of the Witches read Tarot, and regular playing cards, tea leaves, coffee grounds, spider webs and clouds. Scrying in water, dirt, or sand is common. The Appalachian Witch tools are different from 'Wiccan' tools. The Wand, is called the 'rod', it is the dowsing rod and for some Witches the most important tool. It is usually a long straight rod, made of wood from a flowering tree such as dogwood, apple or peach for Water dowsing. A ritual blade is not used; a kitchen knife or an ax will be used instead. Cauldrons are used for many purposes. A cauldron placed in the front yard was an 'open-for-business’ Witches’ sign in times gone by. Mirrors, candles, brooms, pottery, and baskets are other common tools and some of those items are still made at home, by hand in the mountains of Appalachia.

Many times the only tools used are the mind and willpower of the Witch. Appalachian magic was a solitary practice. It required little preparation and no expensive tools or specialized knowledge. It was very practical and down-to-earth; eclectic and informal in its approach, rather than ‘High’ or ‘Ritualistic’ in nature. It was primarily concerned with omens, curses, cures, and protection. Ritual clothing was generally not used, and circles were not cast. All nature was believed to be sacred, so a “sacred” place did not have to be created; Appalachian witches believe magic need not be ritualistic to be effective because Magic is essentially prayer. SOME modern Appalachian Witches, being eclectic already with Scottish, Irish, and Cherokee roots, have started to use some other traditions practices such as wearing ritual clothing and casting a circle.

Many of the old spells and remedies are still used in Appalachia today. In fact a few years ago my father had shingles, a relative in the coal mining mountains of Kentucky told him the best treatment was to rub the area with the blood of a black chicken. (He didn’t try it.) I have spent my life in the mountains of Appalachia. My grandfather was an Irish immigrant, who married a Cherokee woman. I was born in a coal mine camp in eastern Kentucky, delivered by the local witch.

I have painted the porch ‘haint’ blue for my mother-in-law and watched a witch dowse for water after wells went dry. I have experienced Granny magic first hand all my life, even though it was never called that. It was just a part of daily life. This is about the Appalachian Granny magic I know. I hope you enjoyed reading about it. Here is a sample of spells, remedies and beliefs of the people in the Appalachian Mountains. I have included things I have heard and seen. Some work and some don't.

If you dream of a birth, there will be a death and vice versa.
If your ears are burning, someone is talking about you.
When a certain area of your body itches, it foretells of things to come:

left eye = you will be made happy
right eye = you will be made angry
palm in general = you will receive money
back of hand in general = you will give away money
fingers in general = you will receive money only to spend it quickly
right palm = you will shake hands with a stranger
left palm = you will touch money
souls of feet = you will walk on strange grounds

A horseshoe aimed upward, nailed to a barn or house, will protect from evil and bad luck.
A raven that nests on the roof is an omen that a death will occur. To undo this omen you must scare away the ravens before they leave on their own.
Black birds that come to rest on a windowsill are a bad omen.

If it caws while it is there the omen means a death.
If a bird flies into the house it is bad luck.

Finding a dead bird is also considered a bad omen.
Dried basil hung over the doorways, windows, fireplaces will keep ‘haints’ from entering.

Garlic placed under a pillow or knocking 3 times on the bed post will prevent nightmares caused by spirits.

Knocking 3 times beside your door before entering deters ‘haints’.
Bells and chimes are methods of keeping ‘haints’ away. (windchimes).
If you feel you are being followed by a ‘haint’, cross over running water. “Haints’ cannot cross over running water.
To turn away negative forces from humans or animals toss nine broom straws, one at a time, on a fire at sunset.
Squeaky doors are invitations to ‘haints’.
Windows can be protected from ‘haints’ with sprigs of fresh rosemary and basil.
Placing a fern or ivy on the porch will protect against curses. If it’s eaten by an animal, then a curse is already in place.
Yarrow or Lichen Moss hung on a crib or driving a nail into the crib post will drive away curses.
Carrying a piece from a tree that has been struck by lightening will protect the carrier.
Acorns thrown on the roof before it rains will prevent hail damage.
Oak logs burned in the hearth will protect the home.
Pine and Cedar logs burned in the hearth brings prosperity.
Birch logs burned in the hearth brings happiness
Elm protects against curses and evil.
Basil and Rosemary tossed into a fire protects and brings happiness.
A white dove flying over your house is an omen that there will be a marriage, some believe it is generally a good omen.
To rid your self of a wart, cut a potato in half and rub on the wart.
To make your hair grow you should place clippings under the down spout of your home.
To cure a child of asthma, have the child cut a mark on a tree as high up as can be reached. When the child is taller than the mark on the tree the asthma will be gone.
If someone plants a cedar he will die when it grows large enough to shade his coffin.

http://www.iamawitch.com/article.php?story=20060516132527159

Being Claimed By The Goddess

Way Back when i first started this blog i told you of a dream i had where in the Goddess claimed me as her daughter. I told you i would eventually give you full details of this dream…and totally forgot to do so!

 

So my dears, read on to get the full account of that dream….

 

It is a summer day in some wilderness retreat. My friends,family,and acquaintances are celebrating a pagan holiday and i am walking side by side with the OldWoman face of the Goddess.She has a warm grandmotherly feel too her with a keen edge. She wears layers upon layers of grey and black shawls and skirts. Her hair is grey and somewhat mattyand her eyes are black and tinkly like a ravens. We chitchat and laugh together, mostly amused that all these people are here celebrating a pagan holy day and have no idea they are doing so! For several moments we talk and enjoy each others company when suddenly she turns serious. This whole time she has been leading me into the back of a pavilion. The back of it is hidden from the rest of the scene. Once we are there she turns to me, looks me in the eyes and takes my left hand.

 

I feel her draw something on the palm of my hand as she says, “I name you the witch…” and she gives me a name. i would have thought this was a name from my cultural interests…but it wasnt its a name from India and it means “black beauty” or “beautiful night”….

 

So, there you go…how i was claimed by the Goddess….

http://barefootwisewoman.wordpress.com/

Why Take The Journey?

We as a society are often told not too talk about certain things.  A lot of times things such as abuse,self loathing,rape,and fear  are  put on the list of “inappropriate” conversation topics. Especially if they happened too you. Propriety dictates what is “healthy” conversation. It is unfortunate because often just being able to talk about these things can heal even the deepest emotional and spiritual wound.  And so dear reader, you know why i post here. To heal and to challenge the boundaries of “propriety”.

 

In my previous journey post, i asked for healing. My goal for some time now has been healing. You see my darlings, i know that i have a Soul Shard. Several years ago my life was in a terrible state of turmoil. I had been in a state of spiritual crisis for some time and then to add too that i lost my home,my mate, and my friends all in one fell swoop. I had been in such an emotional state that when the final blow was struck i felt something break inside me… If it  had a physical sound i suspect it sounded a bit like glass breaking mixed with a piano string snapping…

 

From that moment forward i didn’t feel like i should. My emotions felt muted, and in some cases gone entirely. It was kind of nice to function is a numb fog.  However,one can only function that way so long and i did return too my roots and start working things out. I was significantly better until 2011. My home was struck by the first EF6 tornado on record and not three days before my father in law had a massive stroke and fell into a coma. Not long after that my mother was diagnose with stage 2 breast cancer…and it went on and on like that.

 

Now i realise ive slipped back into a numb state, and ive started working forward to help find my Soul Shard and retrieve it.  I’m sure some of you may wonder what a Soul SHard is. Its a shamanic concept… and one that modern science, even if it wont admit it, and found as well. When a deeply traumatic event takes place in a person’s life a part of them self seems to shatter and fall away. Thar shard is a part of the soul that has removed it self because of the stress and trauma of the event. That part can almost become autonomous too the rest of the soul. unfortunately this can cause the whole to no longer function correctly. Emotional and mental issues will manifest and eventually can start to case physical health problems.

 

The foremost job of a Shaman(druid,witch wisewoman etc..) in these cases is to search the other world for the shard and reconcile the too parts.  It’s not easy…often the shard will hide and resist. Now i am at that state, finding the shard. Where have i gone? I have found when i am on the other side i am that which is my purest form. Who i am at my core… Not what the world wishes to see, not even what my Mate chooses to see…Me that which is a fragment of the Divine.

 

So on my latest journey here is the progress i made:

I found my self walking down a wooded path, hand in hand with a Shadow. It was smoke like and in the shape of a humanoid. I could tell neither gender nor race only that it was human shaped and meant me no harm.  It walked with me until i reached the shores of the Lake where Barinthus met me in the Barge. Again he was sandy blonde with medium sized dear horns and blue woad tattoos on his face.

 

But this time there was a priestess in the barge with him.  She was silent and he hood was pulled down so i could only see her nose and mouth. She helped me onto the barge without a word. The Shadow stayed on the banks of the lake, as far as i can tell.  From there i sailed too the shores of Avalon and was dropped off there. I made my way through the fields in their final state of harvest. The tools of harvest were brought too my attention and we were instructed to think on what we wished to cut away and what we wished to harvest.

 

Sacrifice and harvest…the same and yet different depending on what side of the fence you are on…

 

Finally i reached the Tor and sat down to consider what it was i was doing here. I was here, again seeking my whole self. I took stock of who i was in this place. I was older, but only slightly.  My hair had stones and feathers hanging in it. I wore the cloths of a Primal Shamaness. I wore a dear skin tunic and a robe of cotton below it. I carried my stang, but she had been completed (ill post pictures when i make manifest her true form here in this world) and i felt who i was. My truest self. And i knew what i needed to ask the Goddess:

How do i bring my truest self into the physical world?

With that a door down into the Mound opened and i followed the steps counter clockwise down…down…down into the hearth.

Whenever i am here i can hear a deep vibrating heart beat…The air throbs with it. The room is medium size and down the center runs a stream like an aqueduct. Small torches on the wall light the area enough to see.  In the back of the room sat a women on a primitive bench.

 

Her hair was white and her clothing simple. As i stepped closer i could see she was spinning her own hair on a spindle.

 

 

I Approached this goddess knowing exactly who she was, she was Ragnell the Arthurian face of of the Owlwoman.  i kneeled before her and she leaned down to be almost nose too nose with me. As i watched her face is was as if smoke would curl over and around her and as it passed her face would change from old and hag like to young and beautiful and back again. i said too her:

Sister, how do i bring my truest self into the world? How to i manifest this self in my everyday life?

Her serine face smiled and she said too me:

Spin the Thread

Weave the Web

Dream the Dream

Remember the Raven (at this point the image of a raven holding a small smooth stone passed through my mind)

See the Owl

Weave the Dream

Make it happen.

With that i stood and walked back too the stairs, i thanked Ragnell and in a shimmer of gold light made my way up…up…up…and out…back into my body…

http://barefootwisewoman.wordpress.com/

Embrace Your Hag Under The Full Moon

It has been far longer than i had realized, since last i posted here. I’m sure you all thought this blog was dead! For a time i suppose it was. Since last i posted i was inducted into the Daughters of the Sacred Grail, a women’s Avalonian group. During which i had a vision of the Horned Hunter.  And earlier this year my partner and i were able to conceive a little girl. As i write i am 8 months and one week pregnant.

  However, today i’m not here to write about my little one (you’d be surprised but one does get tired of talking about their   spawnling) During this period i took off from the blog, i began to study the “Bee Mysteries” so to speak. The past is full of priestesses who were devotees of Bee Goddesses. The topic has interested me every since seeing the remake of The Wickerman. But as of late my path has been heading in a totally different, or rather parallel, direction too Bee Priestesshood. This has left me a bit lost and confused. I kept receiving indicators,messages if you will, on a totally different wavelength.

  My road seems to be dipping down below the normal road of service and ritual. Deep down into the darkness of the Unseen places.

You take the high road,

and I’ll take the low road…

I was and am being lead down the low road. Or at least the Low Road has been made available for my travel. But, again this left me confused and a tad disappointed in my self. I have been championing the Bee Path for over a year now, and it seems to not be part of this new direction…or old direction depending on how i look at it.

  So, in hopes of divining where i’m going with all this, the past few full moons i’ve been working to figure this out in the Otherworld. All things start there and eventually manifest here, so it the best place to get direct answers. Last months whilst on the Holy Isle i became and old woman. A Hag in looks. I was shown an owl and a young child playing in a garden. I filed these things away for safe keeping in my mind.

 

  Still not satisfied, this month i sought out Dame Ragnell Her self. The Lady Ragnell and i have a history together. I assume, since she seeks me out in this world and the Other, that she is my Matron goddess. Last night i sought her under the hill in Glastonbury. Deep down in the widdershin world. The Horned Hunter ushered me to the Otherworld in his barge small white candles hanging from the tines of his deer horns. He asked me what i came to seek and i told him three times. He simply nodded and offered me his hand then helped me off the barge on the other side.

 

  From there i made my way,with purpose, too the Tor  [Image] At the top I found a sort of trap door that i entered and began my decent via widdershin stares. Once i reach the bottom waiting for me was Dame Ragnell with her stark white hair and ancient face. I sat before her and watched her gnarled old hands spin her hair into thread on a bottom whirl drop spindle.

 

  In short order i told her of my trials, of my worry over the Bee Path, and not understanding the direction i’m going. She listened, but only grunted now and then to indicate her listing, or perhaps to punctuate something i was not grasping. When i was spent and had said everything i could think to say, she looked up from her spindle into my eyes. Again, as in times before, Her face would flash from old and ugly to vibrant and beautiful in a puff of smoke. Her eyes turning from beady and black to bright blue.

 

  For several seconds she just looked at me. Finally she grabbed my arm and simply said

Embrace your Hag

 

Then the spindle in Her hand shrank a little and became silver. She handed it to me and cackled out (very much like a raven or crow)

 

You’re symbol

 

I put the spindle in my Crane Bag and when i looked up She was gone…

 ~unknown author~

  Do i know for sure what these things mean? I’m not positive, but i have a good idea. Reflecting back on my phraseology when telling Her of my worries, yes i think i understand her answer. My path is simplistically complicated. I have been looking at the parts and not the underlying current. My road is that of service, but i will always be beside and underneath what most people see. Mine is the way of the old Owlfolk, walker between places. What does this mean for the whole Bee Priestesshood, i’m not yet sure. But at least now i know where North is.

 

The Genius Loci

The Genius Loci is the spirit of a specific area,even cityscapes have some genius loci in them. This spirit will watch over the area and the spirits that reside within it. They are the Guardians of the area and can be a great ally too the practitioner.

This process or ritual is intended to be used on a regular bases to build a relationship with this entity.  The benefits of doing the work is many fold, including helping the practitioner to come to understand, in a more personal way, the symbiosis between man and nature. As well as learning the locations of power spots or Faery Gates in the area,being able to ask favors or petitions of the Land Spirit, and creating a power location for personal spiritual work.

I strongly suggest you not petition the land spirits for anything until you have established a firm relationship with them.

What you will need for the working:

1 red candle
Bread (please remember this is an offering too someone, quality DOES matter)
Wine,beer,or other spirits again quality
any bobbles you may wish to also offer
bell,whistle,or drum

For this rite you will not be casting a circle, so you do need to be mindful of the area you have chosen. If an area feels hostile or negative its a good bet its not a land spirit interested in your company. Thus do not choose to do this working there. I would suggest starting with the Genius Loci near your home. Look for some thing distinctive in the landscape. Often that is where you will make the strongest first connection with the spirit. Once you have found your location you may proceed as follows:

Facing north, place the candle in the middle of your work space, bread to the north of the candle,wine to the west,bell to the east, and finally, you set in the south. If you wish at this point you may walk in a widdershin direction around your work space 3,6,or 9 times. This will help you create a stronger connection with the Unseen spaces. Think of it as cranking on an old Graham Bell telephone.

Settle down before your altar, setting in the south facing north,close your eyes and experience the sounds,smells, and sensations of the area. Try to sense the spirit here. When you are calm and centered and have fully awakened your senses too your surroundings; take up your bell or other instrument and ring it. As you do you must KNOW that this sound rings forth into the Otherworld across the Veil and is heard by the Genius Loci.

Now light the red candle saying something to the effect of:

“I kindle this flame

as a beacon into the unseen places.

I draw the eye of the Spirit of this Land.

A sworn child of the Mother,

who wishes only to honor you.”

Hopefully, if all goes well straight out of the gate, you could get some sort of response here. Be patient and above all, observant. It will be subtle a branch moving oddly, an animal that looks at you in an uncanny manner. If nothing happens, do not fear, it may not for several workings. Just continue on with the work. However, if a feeling of panic, or hostility comes over you, pack it in sister! You’re being told to shove off. But lets say all goes well.

Next hold your hand over the bread and say something to the effect of:

“Here is the bread of life,the nourishment of the Earth

As it gives life too me

i offer of it too you

I consecrate it in honor too the spirits of this land.”

Take a small bit of the bread and say “May we never hunger”

Next take up the cup of wine and say some thing too the effect of:

“Here is the cup of Mater Sangreal

The blood of the Mother

The blood of abundance

I consecrate it in honor of you the land spirits.”

Take a sip of the wine and say “may we never thirst.”

Now you have a few options here, you may place the bread and wine in a hole you have dug, or a bowl,or place the bread in the cup then poor it out as you speak. However you choose to do it bring the two together and say something to the effect of:

“As i have taken,

So this is given

Shared in honor

as one who is of the family of the Old Gods

with the Spirits of the Land.

I give it to the Ground

I give it to the Genius Loci

That the seen and unseen people

and spirits may be made whole

again and live in peace.

For behold,what is taken is truly given,

and what is given is truly taken.

So be it.”

(by the by the line what is taken is truly given and what is given is truly taken is from Robin Artissons book The Witching Way of the Hollow Hill please check it out for more workings and prose )

From here you may leave any other offerings you have thank the spirits and leave your offering of bread and wine on the earth as the invocation suggests. Tahda! you just honored a Genius Loci…now keep doing so! Come back and keep the area clean, feed the animals, do this working again at least once a month. Eventually very interesting things will happen if you allow your self to have the eyes to see and the ears to hear.